Vale Daphne

220px-Nla.int-Daphne_HiltonI learned today that Daphne Hilton has died at the age of 82.

Daphne was the first Australian woman to compete at the Paralympic Games. Her first Games were in Rome in 1960.

The Australian Paralympic Wikipedia Project has authored a page about Daphne. There is an interview with Daphne and her daughter Rachael that forms part of the Australian Paralympic Committee’s oral history project (recorded in 2013) curated at the National Library of Australia.

The interview is available online here.

There is also a 2010 interview available too.

Daphne’s life in sport included opening the Paralympic Village in 2000 at the Sydney Games. In 2012, she donated her Paralympic medals and three team blazers to the Australian Paralympic Committee.

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A Canberra Times article reporting her donation provides information about her Paralympic career. In three Paralympic Games, Daphne competed in five sports (swimming, athletics, fencing, table tennis and archery) and won fourteen medals.

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With Daphne’s death, Libby Kosmala provides the next link with Australian Paralympic history. Her first Games was in 1972 and she will be competing this year in Rio (her twelfth Paralympics).

Discovering Daphne’s story has been a wonderful antidote to some of the ethical issues surrounding the Olympic Movement in 2016.

A girl injured in a riding accident at the age of 17 was able, with the help of her community, to attend the Rome Paralympics and then have the love of sport to take her on a journey of half a century in and around sport.

Vale.

Seven of the members of the 1960 Australian Paralympic Team - the first - at the reunion to mark the 50th anniversary of the Games. The team members and their partners were guests of honour at the 2010 Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards. All but one of the pictured athletes except one were accompanied by their long-term wives of husbands. Of the 12 athletes who attended the Games, eight were still alive 50 years later (Frank Ponta was too ill to attend). L to R (athlete and partner): Chris O'Brien with his sister, Daphne Hilton (nee Ceeney) with husband Frank, Gary Hooper with wife Jan, APC President Greg Hartung (standing in dinner suit), Bruno Moretti with wife Scarlett, Kevin Coombs with wife Linda, Kevin Cunningham with wife Maureen, and Bill Mather-Brown with wife Nadine.
Seven of the members of the 1960 Australian Paralympic Team at the reunion to mark the 50th anniversary of the Games. The team members and their partners were guests of honour at the 2010 Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards. All but one of the pictured athletes except one were accompanied by their long-term wives of husbands. Of the 12 athletes who attended the Games, eight were still alive 50 years later (Frank Ponta was too ill to attend). L to R (athlete and partner): Chris O’Brien with his sister, Daphne Hilton (nee Ceeney) with husband Frank, Gary Hooper with wife Jan, APC President Greg Hartung (standing in dinner suit), Bruno Moretti with wife Scarlett, Kevin Coombs with wife Linda, Kevin Cunningham with wife Maureen, and Bill Mather-Brown with wife Nadine.

Photo Credits

Daphne (Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0)

Daphne and Greg Hartung (Canberra Times)

Daphne (Australian Paralympic Committee)

Fifty Year Reunion (Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0)

Visualising Analysis as a Process

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Introduction

I have been able to do a lot of reading in the last few weeks as part of a research project with Teaching and Learning at the University of Canberra.

I am exploring the learning analytics literature to investigate how teachers might use augmented information to support students’ and their own learning journeys.

This has included literature that might inform my re-view of qualitative approaches to analytics.

George Polya

One of my delightful finds has been George Ploya’s How to Solve it (originally published in 1945).

In his discussion of how to understand a problem, George asks “Can you think of a picture or a diagram that might help you understand the problem?”.

This led me to think about visualisations as heuristics and as ways to explore one’s own cognitive maps.

Two Examples

In the last few days I have found two examples of visualisations of the analysis process.

The first is from Thomas Davenport, Jeannie Harris and Robert Morison’s Analytics at Work (2010:7).

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The second is from a Gartner glossary:

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I do feel much more comfortable with a matrix rather than a 45 degree line. I include the Gartner example here to help me to work through how I might visualise an analysis process.

The use of visualisation as a heuristic device is occupying my thoughts at the moment too as I contemplate how we might induct learners into performance analysis and performance analytics.

A video from FiveThirtyEight about choosing a visualisation has taken me further in thinking about the narrative that can develop as we discuss process issues.

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I wonder if you have some ways to represent the analysis process that might add to my heuristics.

Photo Credit

Dawn on Elrington (Keith Lyons, CC BY 4.0)

Observing the Outcomes of a Bye Week in the 2016 AFL Season

Colouring the AFL Season

Round 18 of the 2016 Australian Rules Football Season was completed on Sunday.

Each season I am interested in mapping each team’s progress compared to their finishing position in the previous year’s regular season.

I use four colours to monitor a teams progress in relation to current/previous relationships.

Legend

A good year for teams would see their colour code being green and gold. A less successful year would be coloured blue and red.

This is my colour scheme up to the end of Round 18 in the 2016 season.

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Changing Fortunes

My genome of a season makes it possible to reflect on the impact of the bye week on each team’s performance.

Each year my interest in AFL performance is focussed by two questions:

  1. Is there an observable change in a team’s performance between seasons?
  2. Does the bye week lift the team to enhanced performance?

Round 18 Ladder has this profile in relation to 2015.

Standings

Both questions give me an opportunity to think about how coaching and support services might be impacting on performance.

Impact of the Bye Week

In the 2016 season, six of the teams have played five games after their bye week, six have played four games and six have played three games.

Overall my picture of post-bye week momentum looks like this:

Total Ladder 18

I have the following profiles for teams in terms of their games since their bye week:

Five Weeks

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Four Weeks

4W

Three Weeks

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The thicker lines in this chart reflect similarities in Geelong’s and GWS’s post bye performance and those of North Melbourne and Brisbane.

The Art of Performance

I have a passionate interest in the science, art and magic of coaching.

Without being involved in the daily training environment, the analysis of secondary data gives me the opportunity to think about how these environments deliver performance trajectories of varying kinds.

In the case of the by week, it would be interesting to learn about the conversations that might be going on at: St Kilda and Carlton; West Coast and Essendon; Hawthorn and Fremantle.

From afar, the art of visualisation performance trajectories makes it possible to contemplate short, medium and long term progress for each of the eighteen teams.