Thinking about unmeetings

Stefanie Butland has been writing about unconferences.

In November, she shared six tips for running a successful unconference.

An ‘unconference’ has no schedule set before the event. Participants discuss project ideas online in advance and projects are selected by participant-voting at the start.

Stefanie’s six tips are:

  • Have a code of conduct.
  • Host online discussion of project ideas before the unconference.
  • Have a pre-unconference video-chat with first-time participants
  • Run an effective ice breaker
  • Have a plan to capture content
  • Care about other people’s success

Stefanie notes that Aidan Budd and his colleagues (2015) have a list of ten rules for organising an unconference.

In a second post in December, Stefanie wrote about the value of welcome in preparing new community members for an unconference.

An unconference of 70 participants had 45 people attending their first unconference. Stephanie wrote an introductory email to these 45:

Stephanie used the free Calendly tool to schedule meetings. She sent some questions in advance of the online conversations (appear.in) and used a Google Form questionnaire to compile responses (individually and collectively).

The online conversations enabled Stephanie “to prime people to connect on day-one of the unconference with others with similar interests or from related work sectors”.  She noticed that: immediately after our conversation, first-time participants would join the online discussion of existing project ideas, or they themselves proposed new ideas. My conversations with two first-time participants led directly to their proposing community-focussed projects – a group discussion and a new blog series of interviews!

She added:

An unexpected benefit was that questions people asked me during the video chats led to actions I could take to improve the unconference. For example, when someone wanted to know what previous participants wished they knew beforehand, I asked for and shared example resources. One wise person asked me what my plan was for having project teams report out at the end of the unconference and this led directly to a streamlined plan (See Six tips for running a successful unconference).

I think Stephanie’s posts are great resources for anyone contemplating an unconference or hackathon. Earlier this year, I was involved in a hackathon in Ireland (#abbotsthon17). One of the issues that did arise then was how to connect a community that was emerging.

Stephanie’s introductory, welcome email resonates strongly with my interest in first-in-family initiatives in higher education. It resonates too with Nancy White’s stewardship practices.

From each of these inspirations, I am very clear about the importance of inducting people into a community and supporting them once they have made the decision to engage (or even participate peripherally).

Photo Credits

Stefanie Butland (Twitter)

P1580274 (David Haberthür, CC BY-NC 2.0)

2017 in review: curating an open educational resource for sport informatics and analytics

In the last year, I have been able to spend time on most days curating the OERu course Sport Informatics and Analytics.  The ease of editing Wikieducator makes this curation a delight rather than an obligation.

One of the features of the OERu guidelines for course sharing is the inclusion of an outline for the course that contains links to all pages and sections. This outline has grown significantly in 2017 as I have added topics to the course. I am particularly interested how these links (120 at the moment) can be used as microcontent and create an opportunity for open badges in 2018.

The main sections of the course are:

Course description

Introductions

Pattern Recognition

Performance Monitoring

Audiences and Messages

Ethical Issues

The Quantified Self

Using R

Visualising Data

Feedforward

Communities of Practice

Knowledge Discovery

Capstone

Six European Football Leagues Going into Christmas 2017

I have been following scoring patterns in six European football leagues (EPL, Ligue 1, Bundesliga, Serie A, Eredivisie and Primera) in the 2017-2018 season.

I have a particular interest in the outcome of scoring first and not losing in games in these leagues.

Prior to midweek games on 13 December 2017, the range of my data (n=875 games) thus far is:

In Ligue 1, the % of games in which the team that has scored first and not lost has ranged between 86% and 89%. In Serie A, the range is 72% to 80%. The other four leagues fit between these two leagues.

My BoxplotR visualisation of nine observations for these leagues is:

The box plot statistics are:

The EPL is about to enter an intense fixture period and I will be interested to observe any changes in pattern.

A separate project is to examine the games in which the team that scores first has lost (n=96 of the 875 games played). The Eredivisie has the largest number of these games (n=23 out of 134 games) and the Primera the smallest number (n=12 out of 150 games).

Photo Credit

Marco Verratti (PSG Officiel, Twitter)

Fireworks (AjaxDaily, Twitter)