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Performance and Analytic Narratives

I have continued thinking about performance issues raised by Craig Duncan (link), Dave Reddin and Tony Strudwick (link). This thinking has coincided with me revisiting the literature on analytic narratives (link). One of the contributors to this literature is Margaret Levi (link). She wrote: The narrative of analytic narratives establishes the actual and principal players, their goals, and their preferences while also illuminating the effective rules of the game, constraints, and incentives. Narrative is the story being told but as a detailed and textured account of context and process,...

Microcontent: narratives and attention

How do online courses engage learners? Alan Levine explores this issue in a post titled Seeking Answers: Can a Narrative Tie a Course Together? (link). He asks "what would it take to apply a storytelling approach in courses outside ones about storytelling". Alan's discussion has its roots in his experiences, with Jim Groom, in the course ds106 (link). Alan's post and the ds106 archive will help with your thinking about narrative in course design, delivery and experience. As you...

Robin Poke’s PhD Submission: A Narrative History of Australian Rowing

Robing Poke submitted his PhD thesis for examination today at the University of Canberra. It is the culmination of six years assiduous research that is titled A Narrative History of Australian Rowing 1770-2016. I have been fortunate to be Robin's primary supervisor. I believe it to be a magnum opus in the history of rowing. It extends to two volumes and shares some remarkable primary sources to build the narrative. The abstract is: This thesis describes in detail the beginnings, development and progress of rowing in Australia through fifteen chapters that set out chronologically how the sport transitioned from the days of...

Data and coherent narratives

Peter Killeen (2018), in a paper that discusses the futures of experimental analysis of behavior, observes "we must learn that data have little value until embedded in a coherent narrative". The construction of this narrative has been a hot topic this week in conversations about data science activities. One example is Evan Hansleigh's discussion of sharing data used in Economist articles: Releasing data can give our readers extra confidence in our work, and allows researchers and other journalists to check — and to build upon — our work. So we’re looking to change this, and publish more of our data on GitHub. He adds: Years ago, “data” generally...

An Introduction to Analytic Narratives for Coaches and Students

Background I received an alert to a paper today that has sent me off to revisit Donald Polkinghorne's and Philippe Mongin's discussion of narrative and the process of historical analysis ... and to contemplate pedagogy. The paper that started my journey today is titled 'The Cooperation of Humans and Killer Whales (Orcinus orca): The Application of a Simple Fuzzy Rule-Based Model to a Historical System'. The authors of the paper are Emery Coppola, Ryan Jones, Jack Owens and Ferenc Szidarovszky. They present: an historical model application that is pedagogical in nature, in that it presents the methodology for constructing a simple fuzzy model...

Entangled narratives: sport performance analysis and sport performance analytics

Introduction This post explores the stories about data we share in sport performance analysis and sport performance analytics. It is an attempt to think aloud about the narratives we construct when we share our observations about performance in training and in competition. The trigger for this post is Emma Uprichard and Leila Dawney's (2016) discussion of data diffraction. I am distinguishing between analysis and analytics as occupations but increasingly these are becoming entangled in sport settings ... particularly when performance analysts extend their learning to include data science skills. This continuing learning is enhanced when we ask second order questions about our practice....

Narration and Narrative Form 02

This is a brief follow up post to some ideas I shared earlier this week in my Narration and Narrative Form post. My Paper.Li aggregator brought me these links today: A 2009 post by Angela Christopher on VoiceThread as an assessment tool. (Which in turn took me to this 2013 TeachThought post.) A TED Radio Hour program Framing the Story. Stories ignite our imagination, let us leap over cultural walls and cross the barriers of time. Stories affirm who we are, and allow us to experience the similarities between ourselves and others, real or imagined. Stories help us make meaning of our lives....

Narration and Narrative Form

I received a Twitter alert overnight from Darrell Cobner (@CPAUWIC) https://twitter.com/CPAUWIC/status/381782446309916672 Darrell and I have been exchanging ideas about performance analysis as story telling and story sharing. (I posted some thoughts about this last week in What Counts?) I was interested to learn that Darrell was sharing some Harold Jarche insights from What's Working and What's Not Working in Online Training. Harold points out that "Today, content capture and creation tools let people tell their own stories and weave these together to share in their networks. It’s called 'narrating your work'". He adds that: The public narration of what...

Produsing Historical Narratives

Yesterday, I wrote a post about my presentation to this year’s Sporting Traditions XIX Conference in Canberra. I have a SlideCast to share today (approximately 10 minutes in length).

Controlling the Narrative (Part 2) #Armstrong

The second part of the Oprah Winfrey interview with Lance Armstrong was televised this afternoon on the Discovery Channel. I am relieved that this part of the story has concluded. I thought Oprah Winfrey was outstanding in her role and I admired the way she dealt with some very significant personal issues for Lance Armstrong in a sensitive way. Richard Hines has taken a much different view of Oprah. The conversation touched upon 'invincibility', 'belief', 'trust', 'love' and 'truth'. Hanging over this conversation was the reality of 'digital remembering'. The "Just Layin' Around" picture was discussed as an example of the on-going story...