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#coachlearninginsport: what to keep?

The 2017-2018 Ashes cricket series ended in Sydney this afternoon. The 4v0 (and one drawn game) result has raised some important questions about long-term planning for the next Ashes series in Australia (2021-22). Both teams face a Marie Kondo-like opportunity. The Konmari method encourages us to: organise by category rather than by room; consider 'Does it spark joy?'; assume everything is going and choose what you will keep. Abby Lawson and Dan Silvestre, among others, have drawn attention to Marie's observations that "People cannot change their habits without first changing their way of thinking" and "It’s not about what to discard, it’s...

#coachlearninginsport Everywhen experiences

I have been immersed in conversations with coaches for the last two weeks and have the opportunity for two more weeks of meeting coaches 1:1. This is my fifth year of conversations with this group of (twenty-five) coaches. Each time we meet a theme emerges that appears to resonate with them and me. On this visit it is 'everywhen'. We have been discussing learning journeys and career options. For some reason these discussions brought up thoughts about the anthropologist Bill Stanner. In 1953, he wrote about Aboriginal Dreaming. Bill's understanding was: A central meaning of The Dreaming is that of a sacred, heroic...

#coachlearninginsport … silent eloquence

During my travels around England this month, I have been listening to Classic FM. Each hour in the past week, there has been a promotion of the Woodland Trust's Big Bluebell Watch that mentions Anne Brontë's Bluebell poem. The second verse of the poem starts with these two lines: There is a silent eloquence In every wild bluebell Every time I hear those lines, I think about the conversations I have been having with coaches over the last four years in a critical friend project. Most of the coaches in the group would get stuck into me about being overly romantic in my view...

#coachlearninginsport: hearing motets

I am in England at the moment. I am here for a month meeting twenty-four rugby union and cricket coaches with whom I have been in critical friend conversations for four years. Whilst I have been travelling, I have been listening to Radio 3 and Classic FM. If I am very fortunate I hear Philip Glass but he is not often played. Yesterday, on a journey to Durham, my drive on the A1(M) was uplifted by a recording of Thomas Tallis's Spem in alium. Spem in alium is a motet for eight choirs of five voices. I find it a most exquisite...

#coachlearninginsport: self-organising networks

Last month, I was invited to join a group of coaches in an online forum. I was delighted to be asked but I have spent much of the time as a peripheral participant ... enjoying the open sharing but not contributing. I thought listening might be a good way to start in a group of online acquaintances. Yesterday, I responded to this message from one of the group: Hi everyone. I'm early in the process of setting up new CPD events. I've been slightly dissatisfied with recent experiences and groups like this show the value of sharing and exploring new ideas. They won't...

#coachlearninginsport: joining an established team

Introduction Earlier this week, I had an opportunity to watch the film Dior and I. I think this is a great resource for coaches to consider. In fact, I rate it as highly as a non-sport coaching resource as Leonard Bernstein‘s The Love of Three Orchestras (1986). It would be a great stimulus to coach learning conversations about leading and following. Dior and I This is the description of the Dior film (2014) from the film website: Dior and I brings the viewer inside the storied world of the Christian Dior fashion house with a privileged, behind-the-scenes look at the creation of Raf Simons’ first haute...

#coachlearninginsport: hooking … and triggering

Introduction I use #coachlearninginsport to pull together my thoughts about coaches' learning journeys. This post started with a prompt in a post written by Bryce Tully. Bryce proposes that "the current trend within high performance sport is to place disproportional weight on the collection of scientific data, while the organizational and psychological factors essential to its success are largely ignored". A second prompt came from a Nathan Kinch discussion about design processes that hook attention. Both these prompts (which speak to my interest in educational technology and learning experience design) coalesced around  a short talk I am giving this evening at...

#coachlearninginsport: besides and with

I had an opportunity to meet some rugby union coaches today. Just before the talk, I happened upon these two chairs looking out at a rugby pitch. The chairs brought Lawrence Stenhouse to mind. In much of his educational research, he would sit besides the person with whom he was talking. When asked about this he said that he understood that people might feel uncomfortable about this but he always asked for their permission. When asked why he wanted to do this he would reply that in this way they could both look at the same world. When I saw the chairs this morning...

#coachlearninginsport Moving from ‘No … But’ to ‘If … Then’ and on to ‘Yes...

I was struck by the introductory paragraph in an Esko Kilpi discussion of pattern recognition. Esko argued: The way we want to make sense of the world around us often has to do with causality. The question we ask is what caused “something” to happen. There is a variable, the “it,” that happened, that is now to be explained. In scientific study this variable is regarded as dependent. An independent variable, or variables, that cause it are then sought. This is also the if-then model of management. (My emphasis). He followed up with this paragraph: Emergence is often understood as things which...

#coachlearninginsport … smelling the coffee

My Scoop.it aggregator collects a diverse range of posts and tweets about sport and performance. I have not set it to search for posts about 'coaching' but sometimes it turns up some delightful surprises. Today, for example, I was alerted to Rachel Hooper's 'The Best Coffee Break You'll Ever Have'. Rachel describes her participation in a Modern Learning Event and shares a timeline of her day at the event. The combination of coffee and coach learning is an important conjunction for me so I was immediately attracted to Rachel's post. I have found coffee a wonderful social lubricant in conversations with coaches. In...