Wangkatjunka

I was driving into Canberra today and managed to hear a delightful program feature on Radio National’s Bush Telegraph.

The impending arrival of CCK09 has encouraged me to continue exploring communities. The ‘Grow Your Own in the Kimberley‘ feature is an excellent example of the impact a small number of people can have on a community of practice.

This is a post about Wangkatjunka and this is the link to an MP3 audio recording of the Radio National program segment.

This is an article about the Wangkatjungka Community. This is some information about the school at the centre of the Grow Your Own project.

(I thought this Panoramio photograph was a great link to the exciting events in Wangkatjungka.)

Judging Canoe Slalom: 2009 Gates (Part Two)

This is a companion post to an earlier blog post about Judging Canoe Slalom. The video was filmed at the Penrith Whitewater Stadium in July 2009 at the Selection Race for the World Championships. The gates used in the video comply with the ICF’s Canoe Slalom Competition Rules 2009 (see Sections 27-30 for information about Marking of the Gates (27), Negotiation (28), Penalties (29), and Signalling by the Judges (30)).

The video is taken from a different perspective than the first video. The aim is to show the sequence of gates.

There is no audio commentary or sound track in the video to enable any user to create their own voice over. The video has an embed code. The video was compressed for this blog post at full quality (60 Mb).

Key Points

  1. There are two sets of four gates.
  2. Gates 1-4 involve two of the new gate set ups. Gate 1 is a downstream gate where the paddler must pass to her or his right to negotiate the downstream gate correctly. Gate 4 is an upstream gate on the left side of the course. The video shows the gate line of both these gates.
  3. The sequence of Gates 14-17 has two ‘new’ gates and a split gate. Gate 14 is an upstream gate on the left side of the course. Gate 15 is a split gate and the paddler must negotiate it to her or his right of the top pole. Gate 17 is a downstream gate and the paddler must negotiate this to their left of the single pole hanging over the water.
  4. One K1M is shown.

The paddler negotiated both parts of the course without penalty. An interesting point is that Gate 16 is moving before the paddler enters the gate line. From the perspective in the video a judge sitting above the gate cannot see the bottom of the pole. During the race there was a judge in line with Gate 16 on the left bank and a second judge above the gate on the bridge.

The video is included here under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.5 Australia licence.

Judging Canoe Slalom: 2009 Gates

This is a brief video to support the training of officials for gate judging in canoe slalom. The video was filmed at the Penrith Whitewater Stadium in July 2009 at the Selection Race for the World Championships. The gates used in the video comply with the ICF’s Canoe Slalom Competition Rules 2009 (see Sections 27-30 for information about Marking of the Gates (27), Negotiation (28), Penalties (29), and Signalling by the Judges (30)).

There is no audio commentary in the video to enable any user to create their own voice over. There is a water sound track. The video has an embed code. The video was compressed for this blog post (approximately 25 Mb). There is a 1Gb file available if required.

Key Points

  1. There are two sets of four gates.
  2. Gates 1-4 involve two of the new gate set ups. Gate 1 is a downstream gate where the paddler must pass to her or his right to negotiate the downstream gate correctly. Gate 4 is an upstream gate on the left side of the course. The video shows the gate line of both these gates.
  3. The sequence of Gates 14-17 has two ‘new’ gates and a split gate. Gate 14 is an upstream gate on the left side of the course. Gate 15 is a split gate and the paddler must negotiate it to her or his right of the top pole. Gate 17 is a downstream gate and the paddler must negotiate this to their left of the single pole hanging over the water.
  4. Examples of paddlers negotiating the course are included in the video.

Note that the video illustrates the potential lines of recirculation for gate 1 if a paddler misses the pole to the left.

The video is included here under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.5 Australia licence.