Mark Scott Innovative Ideas Forum 2009: National Library of Australia

Mark Scott was the third speaker on the program at the Innovative Ideas Forum 2009. Mark’s talk was entitled Connecting with Audiences in the Digital Age.

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Mark Scott has been the Managing Director of the ABC since July 2006. His talk explored the ways in which the ABC was exploring new ways to connect with audiences. He noted that the ABC is a vast network and operates the second largest media site in the world (after the BBC). Mark suggested that the ABC has a reputation for innovation in media space and prides itself on being Australia’s town square. This town square is located in new media opportunities including mobile technologies (see iView and ABC Mobile, for example). Nielsen’s (2009) Global Faces and Networked Places exemplifies the changing demographics for broadcasters.

Mark observed that the ABC creates content and uses whatever devices available to share this content (MySpace, Facebook, Twitter). He noted that the ABC has a very strong service for young people and accesses returning older listeners through local radio.

Examples of the ABC’s use of social networks include YouTube Summer Heights High and Ja’mie King’s MySpace page. This site acquired 67,000 friends in three weeks. Ja’mie’s Facebook page has  14,000 friends and exemplifies the power of viral engagement in social networks.

Mark noted increases in Facebook traffic (149% groth per annum) and the popularity of Twitter. Mark exemplified the potential of Twitter with a discussion of ABC Melbourne 774’s feed on Black Saturday. During the day there were 2500 followers but the multiplier effect meant that 300,000 people received messages originating with 774. He noted too that the ABC’s Q&A show generated significant amounts of Twitter traffic. It is exploring innovative ways to engage audiences. Like the Gruen Transfer, Q&A is using video for a range of purposes.

Mark discussed the strategic and operational implications of using digital media in innovative ways. He noted the ABC’s strict rules of operation and detailed editorial policies. The ABC has user generated content guidelines and is the first media organisation to do so in depth and online. These guidelines are receiving significant attention by international media organisations.

Mark affirmed the ABC’s responsibility to enable communities to share their stories through ABC Contribute. Other examples of this approach include: New Media Showcases; oral history projects for The Making of Modern Australia; Art on the Street uploads.

Mark argued that the ABC is reinventing itself to take advantage of new media. The future offers inclusive, interactive participative environments.

Library Labs’ post about Mark’s talk is here and questions posed to Mark are here.

Anne Summers Innovative Ideas Forum 2009: National Library of Australia

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Anne was introduced as the second speaker of the day by Warwick Cathro. She discussed “The implications of web-based social networking for cultural heritage institutions”.

Many of Anne’s papers are held at the NLA (interesting to note in passing that “Anne Summers was selected for preservation by the National Library of Australia”). She noted, however, that her digial record is changing the amount of her files and papers.

Anne explored the implications of web-based social networking for cultural heritage institutions and discussed the generational change that is occurring in the recording of events. She noted the richness of archived collections of papers and illustrated her discussion with her work on Sir John Monash and Sir Keith Murdoch. She pondered the archival and curation processes for digital artifacts of more recent generations.

She discussed how cultural institutions might manage transient technologies.  She used her own on-line digital identities to explore some of these issues.

Her website is a self managed site. it is used for book promotion, posting articles and speeches. Her blog (the blog) is a forum for the discussion of ideas and issues.

Anne has been using Facebook for some eighteen months and described her use of it for social networking. She noted, in particular, the use she made of Facebook for sharing links to newspaper and journal articles and columns. Anne noted too the use she made of Facebook for marketing and promoting events. She used the example of the Pen Poem Relay as a way of promoting causes too.

Anne considered the role newspapers will play in the recoding of events given analyses of trends such as these. She discussed briefly the contribution of the Huffington Post to on-line journalism.

She concluded her talk with a discussion of approaches to scholarly research and commended the serendipty possibilities available to those who left their digital research desks and explored rich archives of material reposited in cultural institutions such as the National Library of Australia.

Library Labs’ posts about Anne Summers’ talk can be found here and here. This is the link to questions put to Anne after her talk.

Marcus Gillezeau Innovative Ideas Forum 2009: National Library of Australia

The National Library of Australia hosted the Innovative Ideas Forum 2009. I found the Social Networks page of the program fascinating. Items were being added as the forum progressed including SlideShares.

Jan Fullerton opened the NLA Forum and talked about the NLA as an early adoption organisation. She underscored the importance of the Innovative Ideas’ Forum to stimulate creativity and jolt thinking. The Forums have been important NLA staff development resources but they have become a significant open forum too. Jan confirmed that the NLA encourages exploration and has established some boundaries for ‘non catastrophic experience’.  She summarised the content of the 2009 Forum and emphasised the dynamic and increasingly mainstream use of social networks.  She concluded her introduction with a reminder that many NLA users want a ‘traditional experience’ of the Library in addition to the emerging digital relationships.

Warwick Cathro (Assistant Director-General, Resource Sharing and Innovation, NLA) chaired the first session of the Forum. He introduced Marcus Gillezeau as the first speaker. His presentation was entitled “21st Century All-Media Storytelling – The freedoms and challenges of a multi-platform universe“.

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Marcus’s presentation told the story of Scorched from November 2003 to March 2009. He shared with the Forum delegates the all-media approach to Scorched and presented a summary video of the production process that has led to an Emmy Awards nomination.

Marcus described the three-month lead into Scorched via YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. Faux websites were launched to support this approach. He presented examples of this approach from Scorched TV.  The project had a four-year research and development phase that included In the Line of Fire.

Marcus illustrated the all-media approach to Scorched with examples from Cassie Hoffman‘s role in the story (and the influence lonelygirl15 had in Cassie’s emergence).

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Marcus noted that social networks were the key to audience engagement in Scorched.

See the Library Labs’ blog of Marcus’s talk here and this post about the development of Cassie’s role here. This post has the questions posed at the end of Marcus’s talk.