Energy Shared

6155706361_db6632209b_oMore and more these days, I am in awe of the energy that people share in their blogging.

Two posts this week exemplified this energy.

Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano wrote about a modern classroom. In this classroom:

The learning just oozes through the cracks of the physical classroom walls. Learning is amplified by the amount of people who are collaborating, participating, communicating and creating. The learning is NOT about the technology tools, but what students can DO with them to learn in new ways. The learning is about an authentic tasks, that allows students to contribute in a individualized and personalized manner to make them realize that their work matters in the real world.

I liked the ways in which 9-11 year old students used Skype, worked with backchannels (including Google Chat), tweeted, doodled with mindmaps, and took part in a debrief.

Silvia’s post was illustrated with some great pictures. She concludes her post with the question ‘So, where do we go from here?’.

The students are very excited and are taking ownership. There is no talk about what kind of grade they will be receiving for their work. An authentic audience will decide if they were successful. Students will volunteer to take on different roles in the publishing, marketing, finance, communication department. We will allow them to take the lead, consulting, coaching and modeling if needed.

Sue Waters exuded energy in her post too. Sue wrote about advanced blogging and shares a great deal of information with very powerful insights. She has been involved in the current Educational Technology (ETMOOC) as a facilitator of some blogging sessions.

I liked Sue’s use of Storify to crowdsource discussions about planning and sharing information about blogging. I liked her warnings too:

  • This is a long post!  Feel free to scroll down to the sections that interest  you!
  • I’ve kept it in the same sequence as the recording so you can use it to supplement the information covered.
  • I’ve also added some quick videos to demonstrate some ”how to’
  • You can download it as a PDF by clicking on the PrintFriendly icon at the top of the post.

I follow Sue’s work with great interest. This post showed her synthesis skills and demonstrated her ability to enrich her posts with excellent recommendations and resource links. There is great stuff about:

  • Stop, Look, Link
  • Commenting Etiquette and Tips
  • Digital Copyright and Fair Use
  • Post Sharing Etiquette
  • Making Posts Visually Engaging
  • Post Workflow

233168879_9e022b50c9_zI start my meetings with students next week. I am hopeful that I will be able to transform Silvia and Sue’s energies into my own blend of individualising and personalising a modern classroom.

I have not met the 90+ students in the unit I am facilitating (Sport Coaching Pedagogy). I am starting to receive their letters of introduction this week. I have received 20 letters all of which highlight remarkable differences.

All of the students in the unit will have three assessment tasks, one of which is a semseter-long e-portfolio. I am hopeful they will use Dianne McKenzie’s Inquiry questions to support their critical reflection:

  • What did you learn in this session?
  • What surprised or was new to you?
  • What did you already know about? How did you know?
  • What are some ideas that seem new to you?
  • What do you want to know more about?
  • What is something you would like to tell others about?
  • What are some of the important ideas you are thinking about that you might like to implement into your practice?

I will invite them to generate the kind of energy Silvia and Sue exemplify in the richness of their responses.

Photo Credit

Faraday Cage (Britt Selvitelle, CC BY 2.0)

Lighthouse (S Khan, CC BY 2.0)

Sharing Openly and Open About Sharing

I glimpsed a tweet by Richard Byrne this morning:

Just sent this to a good friend who had much of her blog’s content plagiarized. So Your Content Got Stolen, Now What? http://bit.ly/H79gXu

I have a great interest in open access and sharing so followed up on Richard’s lead.

I discovered an excellent resource on his blog Free Technology for Teachers.

Richard’s tweet linked to a post from 24 May 2011 that contains some detailed advice.

  • What to do when you see your blog posts being stolen
  • What to do if you want to reuse someone’s blog post(s)

Richard links to Sue Waters‘s advice too:

I have followed Richard and Sue’s work for some time and am awe struck by their altruism. Bloggers like Richard and Sue (as well as the indefatigable Stephen Downes) have inspired me to encourage students to develop their own e-portfolios.

I hope I have encouraged them to understand that reciprocal altruism is a wonderful characteristic of open access. I will affirm with them Richard’s point from Sue:

… while the web is all about sharing, it’s also important to respect the time and effort that a person puts into his or her blog posts.

This means that we must be careful about the auto posting RSS feeds noted in Richard’s update.

I will remind them about Creative Commons licences too.

Photo Credit

Sharing

 

 

Social Media Sharing

I have been posting some #worldcup updates to Twitter this week. In passing I have accessed a number of links to social media resources through the serendipity of being online at just the right time. A read of Danny Brown’s 52 Cool facts About Social Media started my journey.

I delighted in finding these resources to grow my awareness of social media (driven partly by research for a paper on cloud computing and coaching).

Aggregations of Social Media Links and Guides

Jane Hart shared a great introductory guide to Social Media this week. I am constantly in awe of her awareness of social media and her energy in sharing her discoveries. This week she notes that “This is a social resource as it also provides the opportunity for you to provide your own experiences of using social tools for learning”. This is the link to the contents page of the guide.

I caught up with Darcy Moore’s Prezi presentation on Cool Online Tools too. I enjoyed reading his reflections on personal learning environments in education. “Year 11 will have virtually no opportunity, in their day at school, to use a computer or the many tools available online. During this presentation, I acknowledged that the student delegates will just have to use all this stuff at home. One kid pointed out, that even if they had DERNSW laptops, software could not be installed and many of the sites, especially social media and collaboration tools, would be blocked anyway. I was surprised at how little they knew of the tools discussed. The students were unfamiliar with all the tools, except iGoogle.”

Personal Learning Environments

David Hopkins’ post (from December 2009) shares a collection of PLE diagrams. his own is included:

I liked Skip’s video Personal Learning networks for Educators and thought it was an excellent introduction made all the better by creative editing.

After viewing Skip’s video I followed up on the The Educator’s PLN Ning site.

EduFeeder

At the end of the week, Stephen Downes’ OLDaily led me to Teemu Leinonen’s fascinating post about the EduFeedr project (an educationally enhanced feed reader for blog-based courses). Teemu’s blog post provides some background to this project:

In spring 2008 the authors organized a course on composing free and open educational resources (in the Wikiversity). It was officially a master’s course at the University of Art and Design Helsinki. The authors decided to make the course available with an open enrollment through the Wikiversity and promoted it in their blogs. As a result about 70 people from 20 countries signed up for the course on the Wikiversity page.

The course was organized as a weekly blogging seminar. In each week the facilitators posted a weekly theme and links to related readings on the course blog. The participants reflected on the weekly theme in their personal blogs and commented their peers.

One of the challenges in a large blog-based course is to follow all the communication. Typically this communication takes place not only in blogs but also in other environments such as Delicious, Twitter, etc. Most of these environments provide RSS feeds but typical RSS readers are not very suitable for following this kind of courses. Most of the RSS readers such as Google Reader are designed for personal use. In a Wikiversity course it would be important to have a shared feed reader that all the participants could use.

EduFeedr is a web-based feed reader that is designed specifically for following and supporting learners in open blog-based courses. The design process of EduFeedr is based on the research-based design methodology. We have organized several Wikiversity courses where we have tried out various online tools to manage the course. The initial user needs for EduFeedr came out from this contextual inquiry. Interaction design methods such as scenario-based design, user stories and paper prototyping have been used in the process.

I wondered what role Livefyre might play in stimulating other types of conversation in blog based courses. I think it my have a role to play as another communication channel and I have signed up for the Beta version scheduled for launch on 14 July. From the Livefyre blog:

Livefyre is an embeddable live commenting and conversation platform that turns comment sections into live conversations, increases the quality of those conversations, and drives traffic to content around the web. Livefyre is introducing a number of firsts into the conversation ecosystem, including conversation check-ins, real-time game mechanics, and a revolutionary moderation and reputation system. The Livefyre platform quickly and easily replaces legacy commenting systems on any site.

Publishing

Dodie Ainslie shared a wide range of links and resources this week in her discussion of student publishing sites. This post is part of a wider series of posts about Writing Digitally.

Twitter

EduDemic provides a guide to the 30 newest ways to use Twitter in the classroom. Later in the week Sue Waters published her Twitterholic’s guide to tweets, hashtags and all things Twitter. Sue, like Jane Hart, has a wonderful way to share ideas and practice. Her advice is “for those of you who have heard of twitter and have dismissed it thinking ‘”Twitter is for people with too much time on their hands” — think again :) Educators are connecting with each other on Twitter and using it like a big teachers lunch room that’s open 24/7 whenever they need help, assistance or just want to connect with others.”

Foursquare

I have been slow on the uptake of Foursquare. This week I found a guide that might help me in a post on the Accredited Online Colleges blog. The post observes that “Unlike other social networks, Foursquare encourages people to get out and enjoy their city by sharing check-ins, tips and to-dos while earning points and badges as they explore new venues and favorite hang-outs. Foursquare can also be used in education, though, for online students, lower education teachers, and in campus communities.” Thanks to this post I have 30+ ways to build my practice. A colleague is helping me with this uptake.

Bibliographic Tool

This Zotero Guide for undergraduates jumped out at me.

Cloud Opportunities

I mentioned at the start of this post that I have been writing up a paper on cloud computing and coaching. This is the abstract of my paper, Cloud Computing and Ubiquitous Support for Coaches:

Cloud computing is transforming the ways in which coaches work with athletes and enrich their own professional development. Cloud computing enables “convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction” (NIST, 2009). The pace of change in cloud computing is such that many coaches need access to and the support of educational technologists to manage their engagement with the opportunities the Internet provides. This paper presents examples of coaches’ use of cloud computing.  It explores how the openness of the cloud raises risk management issues for providers of institutional networks. The paper concludes with a discussion of the transformation of cloud resources by coaches through the use of iterative ‘good enough’ approaches to digital repositories (Lund, 2009).

References for the abstract:

Lund, T.B. (2009). Standards and Interoperability. http://edrene.org/results/deliverables/EdReNeD4.3TSR_Standards_and_interoperability.pdf Accessed 8 March 2010.

NIST (2009). NIST Definition of Cloud Computing v 15. http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/SNS/cloud-computing/index.html Accessed 8 March 2010.

Each week I am aware of the enormous opportunities to learn about and share experiences of social media. This week I have accessed Twitter more than usual to post links to my World Cup analysis. I realise that the items noted here are a very small part of a weekly sharing that goes on in and through social media tools.

Photo Credit

How fast do you want to go?