Staff Development Day 2: Ballarat

I participated in the second day of development workshop at the University of Ballarat today with staff in the School of Human Movement and Sport Sciences. The workshop was held next to the delightful Old Post Office Building that is part of the University’s campus. The venue was Alexandria on Lydiard, Leonie Otago, Amanda Mooney and Peter Martin were my hosts.

Today’s program included a presentation from Deb Clarke (Charles Sturt University). She talked with great passion about Smart, Authentic and Meaningful Assessment and provided a compelling account of constructive alignment. This account included clarification of:

  • Authentic assessment
  • Bloom’s taxonomy
  • Diagnostic assessment
  • Formative assessment
  • Summative assessment
  • Norm referencing
  • Criterion referencing
  • Rubrics
  • Standards-referenced marking criteria

I liked her approach to scaffolding assessment and hope to apply some of her excellent ideas around scenario-based assessment tasks.

Sue was followed on the program by Leonie Otago‘s discussion of Research in the School of Human Movement and Sport Sciences. This was a fascinating account of an exciting and emerging research culture around four research themes. Leonie’s presentation was a great example of a senior academic figure using incisive synoptic vision to map out the next phase of the School’s research path.

The morning program concluded with the second part of  Warren Young and Dara Twomey‘s presentation on Research in Context. This led to a vibrant discussion about research trajectories and possibilities.

I left the workshop after lunch and on my drive back to Melbourne I reflected on what a rich two days I had spent with the staff of  School of Human Movement and Sport Sciences. In this blog I write fairly regularly about ecology ideas in relation to teaching and learning communities. I left Ballarat thinking that there is a a remarkable culture in place that will have to adapt to changing circumstances. My hope is that this very special eco system can flourish secure in a collective understanding of what can be achieved by passionate people. I smiled too that this eco system makes wonderful use of nicknames that makes the School such a great place to be.

Staff Development Day 1: Ballarat

I participated in a development workshop at the University of Ballarat today with staff in the School of Human Movement and Sport Sciences. The workshop was held next to the delightful Old Post Office Building that is part of the University’s campus. The venue was Alexandria on Lydiard, a function centre that serves great coffee and excellent food throughout the day.

In the morning I shared some ideas about the Edgeless University and met staff in small groups to explore how sharing might lead to collective flourishing. Leonie Otago, Amanda Mooney and Peter Martin were my hosts. Deb Clarke (Charles Sturt University) was at the workshop with me. She and I were delighted to be invited and involved in the workshop.

The day had some great presentations.

In the morning session:

  • Amanda and Peter discussed What can it mean to be an academic in a changing climate and encouraged participants to muse on the components of transformative education. They discussed motives of service and clarified professional roles and contributions in the University context. Their presentation concluded with a consideration of ideologies of education.
  • Deb Clarke facilitated discussion about authentic, integrated and aligned assessment.
  • Chris Brown discussed on-line learning environments.

In the afternoon:

Neil Trivett, the Director of the University’s Institute for Professional and Organisational Learning (IPOL), discussed Curriculum Renewal. IPOL was established in 2008 “to support the development of a rich learning environment at the University which encourages all staff to expand their personal capacity and to appreciate the characteristics of a learning organisation.” Neil reported the University’s Curriculum Renewal will focus in 2010 in relation to:

News of the University’s Green paper on Curriculum Renewal can be found here.

The day ended with Warren Young and Dara Twomey‘s presentation on Research in Context in which they explored: the meanings attached to research; the teaching-research nexus; barriers to research activity. Warren and Dara noted Gabrielle Baldwin’s (2005) paper on the teaching-research nexus.

Photo Credit

University of Ballarat

Visiting Ballarat

I have an opportunity to visit the University of Ballarat this week and I am looking forward to meeting staff in the School of Human Movement and Sport Sciences.

The School is holding a two-day workshop and I have been invited to join them. I have prepared a presentation titled Edgeless Challenges and Opportunities. In my presentation I would like to discuss the ‘edgeless’ characteristics discussed by Robert E. Lang and Peter Bradwell in order to explore some possibilities for personal professional development. I think Charles Leadbeater’s ideas will help too.

I am fascinated by personal stories. I like the idea that “stories have consequences, but stories change, and how and why they do is the heart of the human enterprise”.

I aim to focus on the opportunities part of my presentation and explore some ideas around personal growth.

I am travelling from one old gold town to another for this workshop. I am travelling too from near the Monga National Park where pinkwoods (Eucryphia moorei) establish themselves in tree ferns as part of their growth process.

Photo Credits

SMB Student Amenities’ Centre

Looking for gators

New Beginnings