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Voluntary and Professional Associations: Signal and Noise

I receive regular blog post alerts from the Scholarly Kitchen. The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) established the Scholarly Kitchen blog in 2008. SSP's mission is: To advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking. The Scholarly Kitchen, a moderated and independent blog, aims "to help fulfill this mission by bringing together differing opinions, commentary, and ideas, and presenting them openly". I admire the way The Scholarly Kitchen goes about sharing openly. I have linked to their posts in a number of my posts. This morning Kent Anderson has a stimulating post about associations. In his...

Cirrus 111203

A brief Cirrus post to end the week. I read with interest news of a Little Printer via a Scholarly Kitchen post. Berg has produced the printer and reports that: Little Printer wirelessly connects (with no configuration) to a small box that plugs into your broadband router. . . . your phone is your remote control. We think of BERG Cloud as the nervous system for connected products. There is more information about the Little Printer on Matt Webb's post. By coincidence the Scholarly Kitchen page had a link to an interview with Clay Johnson. Marc Slocum notes that: Clay Johnson (@cjoh), author of the...

111115 Cirrus

I have read some interesting posts this week. They include: An ABC discussion of attention and the visual cortex. (Reviewing Masataka Watanabe et al.'s paper in Science, Attention But Not Awareness Modulates the BOLD Signal in the Human V1 During Binocular Suppression) News of Real Madrid's use of Cisco's Connected Stadium Wi-Fi at the the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium. "Along with Cisco StadiumVision, the two solutions will allow Real Madrid C.F. and its sponsors to connect with fans in entirely new ways. And by bringing high-definition video of the game to the numerous screens located throughout the stadium, spectators will be able to...

Quick Response (QR) Codes

Background A few days ago I received a Diigo Teacher-Librarian alert to Gwyneth Jones's QR Code Comic Tutorial. Her comic format is a great vehicle for sharing basic information. Her picture reminded me about a Scholarly Kitchen post by Michael Clarke (11 December 2009) Get a Whiff of Google's Augmented Reality Stickers. Some Discoveries I followed up that link with a visit to The Big Wild campaign that is using posters in seven Canadian cities, "hoping to entice smartphone owners to scan the image and access one of our mobile-friendly petition pages." The Big Wild poster uses "a QR code, or 2-D barcode....

Writing Week at the University of Canberra 2010

Today is the start of Writing Week in the Faculty of Health at the University of Canberra. We had a preliminary event last week with Robert Brown. His writing workshop provided an excellent stimulus for disciplined writing for publication. This is the Faculty's second writing week. There are some blog posts about the 2009 Writing Week in this blog. This year the Faculty has scheduled no meetings for the week in order to create time for writing. On Wednesday staff from Sport Studies are meeting the poet Harry Laing at the Old Cheese Factory at Reidsdale to develop our writing skills....

Narrative Engines and Personal Identity

I receive a daily RSS feed from the Scholarly Kitchen. Today I read Kent Anderson's post The "Me at the Centre" Expectation. Kent concludes his discussion about the personalisation of web experiences with the observation that: the Web is both mobile and omnipresent in some ways, but the way it’s being deployed is about each user. It’s the antithesis of broadcast, yet it requires broadcast. And the “filter failure” we’re worrying about requires traditional filters, but then gets filtered further. His post was prompted by Nick Bilton's book I Live in the Future & Here’s How It Works. Kent...

#HPRW10 Sharing

I have been thinking about a framework for my panel contribution at Day Three of #HPRW10.The topic for the panel to address is How do we make the research effort into high performance sport more effective? The abstract I submitted was: There is a wonderful momentum growing around the aggregation of effort in many aspects of social and professional life. Following on from my presentation at the NESC Forum 2009 I am going to propose that a connected network of practice is essential for sport to flourish in Australia. This connected network will be open and through aggregation will ensure that...

Open Access and Sharing

Yesterday I posted news of the publication of the Proceedings of the Seventh Symposium of Computer Science in Sport. When I checked my WordPress Dashboard this morning I found this response to the post: Overnight (in Australia) there were 200 visits to the post following an email alert earlier in the day. I have posted the Proceedings in Box.Net at this link and the Internet Archive at this link. To date there have been 20 downloads of the Proceedings from Box.Net and other downloads of SlideShare presentations. By coincidence shortly after posting the Proceedings I received a request to provide an...