Australian Sport: Six Megatrends

I attended a Future of Australian Sport workshop at the Australian Sports Commission in Canberra today.

Stefan Hajkowicz opened the workshop with a presentation of six megatrends in sport in Australia. These were:

  1. From extreme to mainstream (the rise of lifestyle sports)
  2. New wealth, new talent (economic growth and sports development in Asia)
  3. Everybody’s game (demographic, generational and cultural change)
  4. More than sport (attainment of health, community and overseas aid objectives through sport)
  5. A perfect fit (personalised sport and tailored training systems)
  6. Tracksuits to business suits (market pressures and new business models)

These megatrends were discussed during the workshop and delegates came up with important issues within these megatrends. A key tool for this eliciting of issues was the use of conversational maps.

The day concluded with a discussion of some of the policy implications of the issues identified.

By coincidence yesterday I heard a replay of a Richard Gill talk about the classical music scene in Australia. The trail for it was:

Opera and orchestras in Australia are losing contemporary audiences. Opera Australias artistic director has warned the industry must change or die. So what is the future of opera and orchestras in Australia? Should they change? And how can more young Australians be exposed to classical music?

It struck me at the end of my day at the workshop that we need to extend our discussions across all the performing arts to explore and develop strategic responses to megatrends.

We could use Debategraph to do this too.

Understanding Music Inside Out

After finishing my post on writing I had the opportunity to listen to an interview with Judy Carmichael.

colony400 Photo Source

Judy is the host of the Jazz Inspired radio program. This program explores creativity and each week in the program  “celebrated artists discuss their creative process and how their passion for jazz has inspired their work. They share their favorite recordings with the listener as well as insight into their life and art.”

Her interview explored virtuosity and creativity. This is the MP3 audio of the interview.

Listening to Judy’s ease with discussing Jazz I was reminded of another marvellous music interview I heard two years ago. That was between Michael Tilson Thomas and James Brown in We Were Playing Boulez, But We Were Listening To James Brown! The trail for the program reads:

As a university student, Michael Tilson Thomas and his colleagues were on the cutting edge of modern classical music. One day, while he was driving on the LA freeway, a song by James Brown came on the radio. That song, and the many that followed, changed MTT’s views about how to perform the music of Boulez, Stravinsky, and the like. The level of energy, the precision, the sense of time, the angularity — all gave the young conductor insight into the music he was performing.

mtt Photo Source

The confidence with which Judy Carmichael and Michael Tilson Thomas spoke about music reminded me of Maureen Pope‘s discussion of the personal contruction of formal knowledge and her link to Arthur Koestler‘s articulation of the vision that links poet, scientist and artist.

After listening to both interviews I revisited Howard Gardner’s discussion of multiple intelligences. He suggests that musical intelligence involves skill in the performance, composition, and appreciation of musical patterns. It encompasses the capacity to recognize and compose musical pitches, tones, and rhythms. (Mark Smith)

This reminded me of two quotes:

Music expresses that which can not be said and on which it is impossible to be silent (Victor Hugo)

Music is the silence between the notes (Claude Debussy)

Overall my writing about writing and about music has amplified my interest in performances of understanding and the forms this understanding can take. Lee Gutkind, Judy Carmichael and Michael Tilson Thomas have a great deal in common.

Postscript

Classic FM’s Keys to Music has broadcast (May 2009) four programs about Music Education.

1: The Body
In Part 1 of the series Graham Abbott and Richard Gill discuss the importance of dance and movement in a child’s musical experiences. In this program they are joined by Dr Micheal Giddens, a leading exponent of Dalcroze Eurhythmics.

2: The Voice
Graham and Richard discuss the importance of singing in a child’s life. They are joined by Kathryn Sadler, one of Melbourne’s leading singing teachers and choir directors.

3: Instruments Download
In Part 3 Graham and Richard discuss why learning an instrument is good for children. They are joined by Alastair McKean, Director of Border Music Camp in Albury, NSW.

4: The Mind Download
Graham and Richard conclude their discussion on the importance of Music Education for children. In this program they focus on the proven benefits of musical experiences for a child’s intellectual and social development.