Slidecasts

FrontSSIntroduction

SlideShare is discontinuing its Slidecast Audio Track service at the end of this month.

I think the Audio Track option has been a great feature of SlideShare and I am sorry to see it close.

I am curating some my Audio Tracks here. The Slidecasts (without audio) remain on my SlideShare account.

All of my presentations are open educational resources shared under Creative Commons licenses.

Presentations

Coach Education and Development

Open for Learning (2013) Slidecast


You+ (+) (2012) Slidecast

The audio for this presentation exceeds the 8 Mb limit in WordPress. There is a copy here in my Dropbox public folder.

Reflecting on Coaching as a Vocation (2013) Slidecast

The Expert Pedagogue (2012) Slidecast

 

Long Term Athlete Development

Long Term Athlete Development (2013) Slidecast

 

Open Education

#UCSaffire (2013) Slidecast

 

Transforming the ways we share information (2013) Slidecast

 

Produsing

Students as Produsers (2013) Slidecast

 

Produsing Historical Narratives (2013) Slidecast

 

Produsing resources for coaching and teaching (2013) Slidecast

 

Technology

Edges and Everyday Practice (2013) Slidecast


Sport and Technology (2012) Slidecast

 

University of Canberra Units

I used SlideShare as a repository for presentations made in three University of Canberra Sport Studies units:

  • Sport Coaching Pedagogy 2013
  • Sport Coaching Pedagogy 2012
  • Business, Politics and Sport 2011

The presentations remain in SlideShare but after 30 April there will be no audio with them.

 

Options

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The demise of slidecasting in SlideShare has encouraged me to think about the role audio plays in my presentations.

Most of my sharing is asynchronous so it seems very important to have an audio link with a viewer.

I have been using Prezi for some time. The availability of audio options for the whole of a Prezi (background music) or for specific steps in a presentation look promising.

I do like Stephen Downes’ use of audio recordings for his presentations. I think this presentation is a good example of how Stephen links visual presentations with audio. This was his 337 presentation.

I am starting to experiment with Evernote Presentations too.

 

Photo Credit

Opname van een hoorspeel (Nationaal Archief, no known copyright restrictions)

 

 

Planets Aligning

Earlier this year, I wrote about Lycerius’s dilemma.

Lycerius has been playing Civ II for ten years. In June 2012 the game had advanced to 3991 A.D.. There are three remaining super nations “each competing for the scant resources left on the planet after dozens of nuclear wars have rendered vast swaths of the world uninhabitable wastelands”.

Lycerius’s goal for the next few years “is to try and end the war and thus use the engineers to clear swamps and fallout so that farming may resume. I want to rebuild the world. But I’m not sure how. If any of you old Civ II players have any advice, I’m listening.”

I recalled the dilemma this morning as I started to work my way through a number of emails and alerts that had some interesting connections.

Prezi alerted me to The Rational Person’s Guide to the Mayan Apocalypse in which Jaquelynne Avery shares some news about 21 December 2012.

Maya 1

Here are some of the links I received this morning. I am hoping they are harbingers of an age of transformation (to the Age of Aquarius) rather than a predestined meeting with Nibiru.

Darrell Cobner shared with me Nathan Harden’s essay on The End of the University as We Know It. In the essay, Nathan makes a number of observations about students’ experience of higher education. He suggests that:

students themselves are in for a golden age, characterized by near-universal access to the highest quality teaching and scholarship at a minimal cost. The changes ahead will ultimately bring about the most beneficial, most efficient and most equitable access to education that the world has ever seen.

He adds:

Technology will also bring future students an array of new choices about how to build and customize their educations. Power is shifting away from selective university admissions officers into the hands of educational consumers, who will soon have their choice of attending virtually any university in the world online. This will dramatically increase competition among universities. Prestigious institutions, especially those few extremely well-endowed ones with money to buffer and finance change, will be in a position to dominate this virtual, global educational marketplace. The bottom feeders—the for-profit colleges and low-level public and non-profit colleges—will disappear or turn into the equivalent of vocational training institutes. Universities of all ranks below the very top will engage each other in an all-out war of survival. In this war, big-budget universities carrying large transactional costs stand to lose the most. Smaller, more nimble institutions with sound leadership will do best.

220px-V838_Mon_HSTI wondered, in passing, if Nathan had met Lycerius in Civ II in a 21st century encounter.

The University of Western Sydney is investing $35 million over three years (including providing 11,000 iPads) “in a bid to keep its content and teaching relevant to students”. In her report on this initiative in The Conversation, Charis Palmer notes:

All new students who enrol to study at UWS in 2013 will receive an iPad, and some 1500 academic staff will also receive a tablet device for use in teaching. Existing students will receive a subsidy of $50 to go towards textbook purchases. The investment is part of a broader initiative that will include more flexible study options and interactive learning.

One of the arguments for attendance at a University is the social experience of being there. Stephen Downes has an interesting discussion of this argument today in response to a post by Justin Ritchie. Stephen comments:

if the social aspects of universities are so all-fired important, what happens to the large majority of the world’s population that never attends university? Do they just become socially stunted? Inept? Or is it possible that these social dimensions may be addressed in ways other than university pubs and social clubs?

One alternative might be to engage in a community of readers that discuss and share ideas. A post by Michael Lovett alerted me to the growth of readership in Next Generation libraries.

Since the relaunch of Dayton Metro Library, readers are spending 22-percent more time on site, viewing 22-percent more pages. At the Public Library of Cincinnati And Hamilton County (Ohio), which relaunched on Monday, sample excerpts are up 93 percent. The North Carolina Digital Library (Chapel Hill Public Library, Greensboro Public Library, Hickory Public Library) has seen significant increases in page views (15 percent), time on site (18 percent), visits (10 percent), and sample excerpts (35 percent).

Meanwhile in the Scholarly Kitchen, Phil Davis was writing about How Much of the Literature Goes Uncited?

How much of the literature goes uncited? It seems like a simple-enough question that requires a straightfoward answer. In reality, this is one of the hardest question to answer, and the most appropriate response is “it depends.” A citation is a directional link made from one paper to another. In order to count that event, that link must be observed. And while counting a citation confirms that an event took place, not observing a citation does not confirm that it didn’t.

Given my own online reading habits, I think that discoverability in a semantic web is becoming much more important that citation. I tend to follow Related Article links in Google Scholar as a personal learning tool. I start with 2012 papers and move backwards to saturate my literature search.

I find this approach empowering. By coincidence an email from John Kessel sent me off to the Harvard Business Review and Nilofer Merchant’s suggestion about power:

If you currently equate your power with your bossness, your ability to have all the answers, and getting credit for everything you do, then you are set up to thrive in the past. Thriving in the Social Era requires different skills: collaborating rather than commanding, framing and guiding rather than telling, and sharing power rather than hoarding it.

I finished my early morning reading with the story of a toddler in Townsville in North Queensland who has incubated a nest of Eastern Brown snakes (one of the world’s most deadly species of snake) in his bedroom closet. Kyle is just three years old.

The story from the ABC news site indicates that Kyle managed to do this by himself. His negotiation of the threats posed by venomous snakes seemed a perfect allegory for the start of the Age of Aquarius.

I am definitely on the side of transformation in 2013 … and thinking about how I would support Kyle’s learning journey and his co-learners who will live in the 22nd century.

Photo Credit

V838 Mon (Wikipedia)

#SCP12 The Power to Point

Today is delivery day for students taking part in the Sport Coaching Pedagogy unit at the University of Canberra.

They will be sharing their link to a presentation each of them has posted online.

I received an overnight flurry of links from the group.

Most have used SlideCasts in SlideShare, some have used Prezi, two have used Archive.org and there is one YouTube video.

The YouTube link created a teachable moment for me.

I was compiling the links to the presentations on the unit’s Wikiversity eportfolio page and was alerted to the YouTube link as spam. When Wikiversity drew my attention to this and that I could not save the page with the link in it I wondered if I had compromised the whole page.

Fortunately I had not but it reminded me of how much confidence one needs to build resources.

Today’s meeting in the unit is focusing on Produsage.

After reading Joseph Esposito’s Scholarly Kitchen post on skeuomorphic publishing I am starting my next phase of exploring the power to point to resources open for sharing and reshaping. Joseph concludes that:

What is missing, though, is an industry-wide commitment to think about new media as new media. Rather than contrast and compare it to print, we could be thinking about digital media’s unique properties.  We should not be replacing print collections with digital ones; we should be superseding them.

Photo Credit

Big Issue Seller