Open to Sharing

I have come across four interesting posts about sharing this week.

The Open Cloud Initiative

A Code of Practice for the Fair Use of Online Video

ALISS’s 2011 Summer Conference

An interview with Sir John Daniel

I thought all four offered excellent insights into the disposition to share openly.

The Open Source Initiative defines Open Source licensing in relation to:

  • Free Redistribution
  • Source Code
  • Derived Works
  • Integrity of the Author’s Source Code
  • No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups
  • No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor
  • Distribution of License
  • License Must Not Be Specific to a Product
  • License Must Not Restrict Other Software
  • License Must Be Technology-Neutral

 Sir John Daniel suggests in his interview with Creative Commons that in relation to licensing of Open Educational Resources  “My advice is to just do it and don’t get too fussed about the license at the beginning”.  He adds that “our policy simply says COL will release its own materials under the most feasible open license, which includes the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license … we encourage people to not use noncommercial if they can avoid it, and we follow our own recommendation.”

The Centre for Social Media’s Guide to Fair Use “is a code of best practices that helps creators, online providers, copyright holders, and others interested in the making of online video interpret the copyright doctrine of fair use. Fair use is the right to use copyrighted material without permission or payment under some circumstances.”

I thought the ALISS report of the 2011 Conference on the topic of Social Media, Libraries, Librarians and Research Support exemplified this disposition to share openly. In addition to links on the conference site, papers from the conference are available on SlideShare. I liked the range of resources available.

As an aside each of the alerts to these four items came from different sources. This in itself exemplifies for me of the power of self-organising groups and networks.

Photo Credits

Maze

Lighthouse

Open Language

UCNISS submitted an open tender to the Australian Paralympic Committee this week.

We submitted a proposal to produce A History of the Paralympic Movement in Australia, and to establish a repository of media and digitised primary resources to compliment the text.

The tender was written as a Wikiversity page.

The process of becoming open has been a great personal learning experience. I am fortunate to have had Leigh Blackall and James Neill as my guides and to access Stephen Downes’ OLDaily to extend my horizons.

Stephen has presented his ideas on The Role of Open Educational Resources in Personal Learning this week. I liked his discussion of a language of open learning:

  • We have to stop treating online resources as though they were ‘content’
  • The people who actually use them have moved far beyond that
  • These artifacts constitute a new language; they are a large, complex, post-linguistic vocabulary
  • That’s why they need to be open

Our open tender has received a great deal of interest and comment. The objections to the project we are proposing to the Australian Paralympic Committee underscore for me how important it is to revisit and develop the forms an open language may take.

I am still waiting for the arrival of Stanley Fish’s book in my local bookshop and hope the issues raised there will help me develop my open language and practice.

Advocacy of openness requires many literacies. I am keen to explore how the form of our writing contributes to the flourishing of a sustainable, collaborative approach to the produsing of open educational resources.

Writing Week at the University of Canberra 2010

Today is the start of Writing Week in the Faculty of Health at the University of Canberra. We had a preliminary event last week with Robert Brown. His writing workshop provided an excellent stimulus for disciplined writing for publication.

This is the Faculty’s second writing week. There are some blog posts about the 2009 Writing Week in this blog. This year the Faculty has scheduled no meetings for the week in order to create time for writing. On Wednesday staff from Sport Studies are meeting the poet Harry Laing at the Old Cheese Factory at Reidsdale to develop our writing skills. We are in for a treat judging by an excerpt from his poem Wordsmith:

…Cold forgery is impossible,
Words must bleed from a hot core –
They bulb at my fingertips
Exuded like beads of mercury, my sons
Hatched from the ashes and into the blaze with them
See those salt blue flames singing at the margins –
That is spirit, quicker than embers
Thumping, banging smith-spirit.

Whilst the Faculty’s Writing Week is in its second year Meanjin is celebrating its seventieth anniversary. A recent Radio National Book Show (24 November 2010) celebrated the anniversary and discussed the role of literary publications in a digital world. The discussions about a published journal compared to an on-line journal mirrored debates in the academic world about open access.

It was interesting to listen to Jim Davidson and Christina Thompson discuss Meanjin and the role of editors in forging a publication’s identity. I was very interested in Christina‘s discussion of her work at the Harvard Review and the positioning of the Review in a digital age. I noted the importance Christina attached to Laura Healy‘s work with the Review’s website (see too Laura’s Chocolog site).

Just as I was savouring these thoughts, Colm Toibin appeared on the same Radio National program to discuss his Off the Shelf books (Off the Shelf is a regular segment on the Book Show where writers and artists talk about a book or books that have influenced their thinking, or one that they go back to for inspiration). His discussion of Ernest Hemmingway’s The Sun Also Rises and A Moveable Feast explored the art of writing. (James Topham said of the A Moveable Feast “I think there is no author that makes you want to write than Hemingway; every sentence he writes seem to suggest a joy and delight in his craft”.)

I am looking forward to the joy and craft of writing this week.

Photo Credits

Writing Home 1914

D’Aug Days