Connecting and Flipping

3712154175_7f25d99141_bI wrote about Flipping yesterday.

Overnight Mark Upton commented on the post. I admire Mark’s work immensely and was delighted he shared links to examples of his flipping work:

These resources appeared in July and August last year. Mark’s sharing of them underscored for me a point made by Alison Seaman in her 3 January post:

It takes time and a level of humility to come to terms with the idea that knowledge is no longer contained solely “in [our] skulls, books, and libraries” and is instead constructed from knowledge distributed across networks and on the Web.

Alison discusses how  connecting with and learning from colleagues nourishes and develops your personal learning network (PLN). I liked Alison’s quote from Dori Digenti:

The PLN consists of relationships between individuals where the goal is enhancement of mutual learning. The currency of the PLN is learning in the form of feedback, insights, documentation, new contacts … It is based on reciprocity and a level of trust that each party is actively seeking value-added information for the other.

My own PLN is based on: mutual learning, reciprocity and trust. Mark is an important part of my development as a learner and I trust his judgement implicitly.

Thinking about trust and personal learning led me to David Hopkins’ post about Creative Commons licenses. I use Creative Commons (CC) images in most of my posts. David points out that “A photo or image placed under a Creative Commons license enables you, the ‘borrower’ to copy, distribute, and display the work providing the photo or image is correctly attributed to the owner. Every CC license applies worldwide, is non-revocable, is not exclusive, and lasts for the duration of the work’s copyright”. However, he notes that: more than 90% of CC photos are not attributed; more than 99% of CC photos that are attributed are not attributed properly.

When I use CC images in my posts I provide a url for the image and include the photographer as a tag for the post. In the last two months I have been providing a link to the specific license for the image. David provides a link to Photo Pin. This service searches for CC images on Flickr and provides a choice of size/resolution of the image, a link to the original image and the HTML code to attribute the photo, owner, and CC license used.

Here is an example of my search for a Parkour image:

Parkour example

As I explore ideas and practices of flipping through connecting I am conscious that I do need to open up to intuition and creative leaps of the imagination. An interview with Bill Duggan encouraged me to think about neural plasticity, curiosity and “presence of mind”. Stephen Downes does this for me every time I receive his OLDaily.

Today, Stephen reflected on an essay by Lev Gornick on IT Trend in Education in 2013. Stephen looks at two different issues:

  • The impact of HTML5 will be widely felt (and exemplifies the change underway with this New York Times article) with widespread integration of multimedia and text in ordinary things like books, posts and articles.
  • Dynamic learning materials (and dynamic reading materials generally) – multimedia posts and articles connected to live data sources (see, for example,  weather bugs, Yahoo stock charts and Google Maps mashups) will become widespread.

My excitement about what might be possible in 2013 flipped learning environments was tempered by a very sobering post from Kent Anderson in The Scholarly Kitchen. He identified some of the threats posed by ubiquitous computing and connectivity and concluded his post with this observation “With the smartphone as one likely instrument of havoc in a world full of connected hostilities — personal, military, national — the benign face of technology is being remade”.

Kent is another trusted source in my daily connections and with his insights I realise I must adopt a much more nuanced approach to flipped learning opportunities. I will not try to get over excited about the possibilities afforded by the New York Times’ innovation Snow Fall … but it is hard not to take a naive view of open learning.

My next task is to look at Brook Ellingwood’s look at Snow Fall. In it he suggests “What makes the piece so remarkable isn’t that the New York Times has created anything new in a technical sense. It’s that instead of retreating from what’s disrupting their business they have embraced it and made it even better by using it to showcase their traditional strength: Meaningful storytelling”.

That seems a great way to look at transformation in teaching too … embracing connecting and flipping as essential elements of stimulating and supporting learning.

Photo Credit

Parkour Practice (JB London, CC BY-NC 2.0)

Communication, Social Media and the Coach

I am meeting with Robin McConnell‘s undergraduate Advanced Coaching Studies’ group on 29 April.

My discussion topic is Communication, Social Media and the Coach.

This blog post is the start of a conversation with the group in advance of the meeting.

I am keen to discuss:

  1. Coach and athlete communication.
  2. Opportunities provided by social media to share ideas and discuss performance.
  3. Augmented information.

This blog has a number of posts on these topics. I am hopeful that the students coming to the meeting have an opportunity to look at:

There are many more posts that might be of interest (and some SlideShare presentations) but I am keen to explore how students in the group engage with social media and cloud computing. I will be asking about slow reading too (Kingsley, 2010). I will recommend SIRC’s excellent social media resource and mention Wirearchy via Harold Jarche’s post Social Learning, Complexity and the Enterprise. I will point to Tom Slee’s post on social media (via Kent Anderson), Jason Kramer-Duffield’s discussion of communication ecologies and evidence about the Internet and civil society. Brian Solis posted about the social genome in his discussion of The Three C’s of Social Networking (consumption, curation, creation).

A recent report from Canada (2011) points out that:

Cloud computing is a loose and evolving term generally referring to the increasing use of computer applications that are web-based. A cloud-based application does not need to be downloaded to a user’s computer or institutional servers, and the data used by the application and inputted by the user is housed on servers elsewhere. The application works remotely: it’s not physically present, it could be anywhere in the world (hence the term “in the cloud”).

Social media applications are by definition cloud-based: Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, Blogging services like WordPress.com, Blogger, Tumblr or Posterous, or link sharing sites like StumbleUpon, Digg. Any individual may sign on and start using such services independent of their institutional affiliations.

The students in the group will graduate this year at a remarkable time. As coaches in a digital age they will become produsers of learning resources that can have profound impacts on personal learning environments.The scale of this age is indicated by Gary Hayes’ Social Media Counts (13 April 2011):

(For an alternative set of metrics see Is Social Media Ruining Students?)

I hope to end our discussions on with a consideration of leadership behaviours that will resonate with Robin’s discussion throughout the unit. I hope too that we can explore the role augmented information plays in short, medium and long-term coach-athlete relationships.

I will be suggesting that the students follow up on a great case study of the use of social media. Mark Upton and Robert Oatey have developed teamsportcoaching.com. Mark and Robert are strong advocates of coach education and are “true believers in the potential of the online medium to deliver content that can enhance a wide variety of coaching methods and disciplines”. I think Mark’s post, Creating the ‘coachable moment’ with PlayerTube and online video, exemplifies excellent use of social media based upon profound understanding of the coaching process.

After all this discussion I will recommend reading Connectivism & The Relationship Era. The post includes this observation which seems a great place to end the day’s conversation:

In the connectivist learning model, the flow of knowledge is more important than the knowledge itself. In other words, the process is more important than the content. The main reason for this is that there is a constant need for quick adaptation. In this era, knowledge must be directed quickly to where it is needed to be applied. Once it has served its purpose, it is archived and momentarily forgotten. Notice that discarding information is now practically unheard of because once the connection has been made (i.e. something is learned), it will be stored somewhere. The additional task is mere retrieval or recollection.

Postscript

In this post I am considering free social media. There are a variety of third part software services available too. A recent white paper on Becoming a Social Business (2011) observes that:

The rise in consumer-oriented social networking applications and platforms over recent years has drawn curiosity from enterprises both large and small. IDC believes that curiosity has turned into business opportunity as the lines between consumer and enterprise continue to blur. Unfortunately, adoption of social software in the enterprise has encountered some skepticism due to the hype surrounding the technology and the perception that it is the younger generations’ means for socializing with friends. It has also been criticized as being a waste of time. Yet there is evidence to suggest that this doubt is shifting and that enterprise social software is becoming the next generation of collaboration tools to enhance organizational productivity.

As an example IBM has a social software available (IBM Connections):

Photo Credits

Coaches watching the fight

Coach with the wrestler’s hat

Wrestler with his coach

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