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A Fra Mauro kind of week

Fra Mauro was a cartographer. He lived in the Republic of Venice in the fifteenth century. I found out about him in James Cowan's (1997) A Mapmaker's Dream. In that account, Fra Mauro welcomed visitors from all over the world in his monastery and used their news to develop his map of the world. I loved the idea that he could be in Venice and yet be connected with voyages of discovery and established trade routes. I had a Fra Mauro feeling this week in rural New South Wales. Social media, particularly Twitter, brought me news of adventures elsewhere. Jacquie Tran was on...

Price and Value as a Performance Analyst

Background This post what I think Mark Upton calls a fragment. It is my attempt to pull together some strands in a debate I need to explore. It is a debate about valuing people not pricing them. I have an apology to make at the outset. In a post written yesterday,  I mentioned that I had been discussing internships with the Australian Catholic University’s  2018 cohort of the Graduate Certificate in Performance Analysis course. I did not make it explicit (hence my apology) that it was a lively discussion and I used the word 'slavery' and talked about 'minimum living wages'. It started with...

Understanding

Mark Upton wrote a post this week titled KPIs, Comparative Coaching & Classrooms. In September, Mark and Ric Shuttleworth will begin facilitating conversations about ‘relearn Team Sports’. I think their six-month journeys with coaches will be fascinating. In his post, Mark wrote: My own experiences and observations suggest there can be a disproportionate amount of time analysing, editing and preparing video clips for the “classroom”, in comparison to the time spent thinking about and designing purposeful (perhaps even creative!) on-field activities and sessions. In October, I am presenting at the HPX 2017 Knowledge Exchange Conference in Dublin. In addition to a one-day hackathon for...

Mechanisms and Machineries

Mark Upton has posted his eighth fragment in his compelling discussion of sport systems. I am fascinated by Mark's insights. His latest post coincides with the end of my visit to England (and Ireland) after a month of conversations with coaches. Mark's theme resonates powerfully with the direction of our conversations. In his post Mark quotes Carol Black on schooling and notes 'the fallacy of social engineering ' that is: the false belief that it is possible to institute a top-down, mechanical structure, impose it on a complex living system, and expect predictable results. Mark observes of this: it is unfortunate yet not unexpected that...

Complex Systems in Sports

An international congress of complex systems in sports is being held in Barcelona in October 2017. The venue is the Camp Nou Stadium. There is a call for abstracts. The two-day program includes presentations from: Scott Kelso (Principles of Coordination) Wolfgang Schöllhorn (Differential Training) Rafel Pol (Cons-Training in Team Sports) Robert Hristovski (Unpredicatability in competetive environments) Jaime Sampaio (Dimensions of Performance) Paco Seirul-lo (Closing remarks) There are seven workshops: Game and performance analysis Training and learning methodologies Injuries Performance assessment in sport Developing resilience Athletes as complex adaptive systems Interpersonal coordination News of the conference appeared as the Sante Fe Institute is running its open, online course Introduction to Complexity. When I enrolled, there were 2367...

#coachlearninginsport Moving from ‘No … But’ to ‘If … Then’ and on to ‘Yes...

I was struck by the introductory paragraph in an Esko Kilpi discussion of pattern recognition. Esko argued: The way we want to make sense of the world around us often has to do with causality. The question we ask is what caused “something” to happen. There is a variable, the “it,” that happened, that is now to be explained. In scientific study this variable is regarded as dependent. An independent variable, or variables, that cause it are then sought. This is also the if-then model of management. (My emphasis). He followed up with this paragraph: Emergence is often understood as things which...

Richard, Mark, Darrell, Sheila, and Arvo

I spent part of yesterday listening to Richard Tognetti. Richard appeared on Radio National's Music Show here in Australia. He was discussing nerves, fear and fallibility in music performance. I liked the idea that we can give in to little mistakes, trust in what we have learned ... and in Richard's terms be "match brave". I thought it was an excellent insight into the dynamics of public performance. I enjoyed the comparison of big wave surfing and conducting Ravel for the first time. Two alerts this morning extended my thinking about public performance. The first was about a Mark Upton post on...

#coachlearninginsport: technology, data and pedagogy

Introduction Two blog posts last week set me off thinking about technology, data and coach learning. Both posts came to me through my Medium alerts. Mark and Audrey Mark Upton shared his thoughts on "the use of technology and data to help people be their best in sport". Audrey Watters discussed digital identities and the ways in which "all of us increasingly perform our identities, do our work, play our play mediated through new technologies". Mark made a number of excellent points. These included: Any technology that enables people to connect and share on their terms, when they otherwise wouldn’t have, has great potential to...

Coaching as an Occupation

Introduction I received two excellent alerts today. Both helped me think more about coaching as an occupation. I am feeling very reflective at the moment, more so than usual. The death of a coaching friend, Dean Bailey, is a significant part of this. John's Mum In the first alert, John Kessel writes delightfully about why his Mom would have been a GREAT volleyball coach. John's Mom taught first grade pupils for over thirty years. He writes about how the lessons he learned from her shaped his coaching. His Mom: made sure every student knew how artistic and creative they were. taught to 25 individuals, not making...

Connecting and Flipping

I wrote about Flipping yesterday. Overnight Mark Upton commented on the post. I admire Mark's work immensely and was delighted he shared links to examples of his flipping work: Coaches - learn how to do the "Flip" "video homework" for your players These resources appeared in July and August last year. Mark's sharing of them underscored for me a point made by Alison Seaman in her 3 January post: It takes time and a level of humility to come to terms with the idea that knowledge is no longer contained solely “in skulls, books, and libraries” and is instead constructed from knowledge distributed...