The use of time-outs in IPL cricket: a guest post by Krishna Tunga

Introduction

Last week, Ron Smith wrote a guest post for the Clyde Street blog. One of his concluding remarks was “I wonder if some form of time out will be the next initiative IFAB discusses”.

This sent me off thinking about games in which time-outs do occur. Given that IPL cricket has had strategic time-outs for some time, I thought I would ask my friend Krishna Tunga to share the insights he has gained from his meticulous observation of IPL cricket using data from the 2018 IPL tournament.

Krishna’s analysis of cricket was recognised in the Shorter Wisden 2018. I think this was a delightful way to acknowledge the passion he has for the observation and analysis of cricket.

As a background to his post the regulations for IPLT20 stipulate:

11.6 Time-Outs

11.6.1 There will be two time-outs of 2 minutes 30 seconds in duration in each innings. The time-outs are to allow the teams to re-group tactically. Umpires and players must start to move back into their positions after 2 minutes in order to resume play when the countdown clock reaches zero seconds. (My emphasis)

11.6.2 Drinks may be brought out on to the field during the time-out. No practice is allowed.

11.6.3 Subject to clauses 11.6.4 and 11.6.8 below, the above-mentioned time-outs will occur in each innings of matches which are not Interrupted (such that the scheduled number of overs in respect of such innings remains 20) at the following times: (a) at the end of either the 6th,7th, 8th or 9th over at the election of the fielding team and (b) at the end of either the 13th, 14th 15th or 16th over at the election of the batting team.

Time-Out in Cricket

At Keith’s request, I have compiled data on time-outs from 58 of the 60 games played in this season’s IPL tournament. (Two games did not have time-outs due to reduced overs in the games.)

My short summary is:

Time-outs for bowlers have enabled bowling teams to limit run-rates after power plays. (My measure of this is the percentage of consecutive overs with 5 runs or less.)

Batting time-outs come at a time when the batting sides are accelerating their accumulation of runs.

I have looked closely at both sets of time outs in each innings of the games: Bowling (nBowl); and Batting (nBat). I thought it might be helpful to look at the nBowl+1, nBowl+2 over patterns as well as nBat+1 and nBat+2 overs before time-outs (Pre-TO).

First innings

MeasurePre-TOnBowl+1nBowl+2nBat+1nBat+2
Overs4826012059118
Runs38434519435601093
Wickets10611262451
Average36.2541.0036.2723.3321.43
Runs/over7.977.527.869.339.18
Balls per wicket2733281514
Scoring rate56.7469.4470.0068.4568.41
Singles/ 100 balls3451504041
Boundary/ 100 balls1913141918
Sixes/ 100 balls54587

Second Innings

MeasurePre-TOnBowl+1nBowl+2nBat+1nBat+2
Overs4585811554108
Runs3761426865456972
Wickets11011271533
Average34.1938.7332.0430.4430.38
Runs/over8.217.347.468.449.00
Balls per wicket2532262220
Scoring rate57.2466.0968.6069.4470.28
Singles/ 100 balls3348504644
Boundary/ 100 balls2012131517
Sixes/ 100 balls55456

I have also looked at what was happening before the time-outs: nBowl-1, nBowl-2 over patterns as well as nBat-1 and nBat-2 overs.

First Innings

MeasurePre-TOnBowl-1nBowl-2nBat-1nBat-2
Overs4826012060120
Runs384352010204831022
Wickets1069223253
Average36.2557.7846.3615.0919.28
Runs/over7.978.678.508.058.52
Balls per wicket2740331114
Scoring rate56.7465.2864.8665.2866.25
Singles/ 100 balls3441414443
Boundary/ 100 balls1919181618
Sixes/ 100 balls56656

Second Innings

MeasurePre-TOnBowl-1nBowl-2nBat-1nBat-2
Overs4585811654108
Runs3761497976425926
Wickets11012201834
Average34.1941.4248.4023.6127.24
Runs/over8.218.578.417.878.57
Balls per wicket2529351819
Scoring rate57.2465.5266.2462.6566.67
Singles/ 100 balls3343444142
Boundary/ 100 balls2020181316
Sixes/ 100 balls54567

There are more data to share from the IPL. This post is an initial response to Keith’s request … and I hope the start of a bigger conversation about strategic time-outs hinted at in Ron’s post about football.

I write about Indian and world cricket on my blog site All That Cricket. My Twitter account is @allthatcricket.

Photo Credits

IPL 2014 RRvRCB (Ramesh NG, CC BY-SA 2.0)

Analysing #BBL06 … in Mumbai

My friend, Krishna Tunga, analyses the world game of cricket from his home in Mumbai.

I was introduced to Krishna over a decade ago by John Buchanan. Since then we have corresponded regularly about cricket performance. I had hoped that Krishna’s observation, data capture and data analysis skills might be of profound interest to any cricket organisation looking to compete in the sub continent.

As a result of his connection with John, Krishna has had a long term interest in Australian cricket performance. He monitors all Australia’s international performance in Test, ODI and T20.

He share this analysis on his web site, AllThatCricket.

Krishna has been looking at #BBL06 too. Despite time difference between Australia and Mumbai, Krishna builds his rich performance database with live, ball by ball encoding.

This is an example of his synthesis of data. BBL-6 Scorchers success very predictable using the right metrics!

Whenever I see Krishna’s data, I am staggered by his ability to record granular detail in real time.

His data archive extends to two decades of international cricket. This makes it possible for him to contextualise current performance.

This is an example of his work: an analysis of Australian one-day cricket since 1998.

I do hope that Krishna continues with his analysis. His work is a wonderful resource for anyone interested in cricket performance.

Guest Post: Krishna Tunga on T20 World Cup Cricket

Introduction

I have great pleasure in presenting a second guest post on Clyde Street. In July, Greg Blood wrote about Human Performance, Sport Science and Technology.

Today, Krishna Tunga is sharing his work on the T20 World Cup in Sri Lanka.

Krishna and I have been corresponding for a number of years about observing and analysing cricket.

He is the author of the allthatcricket.com blog.

T20 World Cup

In this Tournament, the team that has batted first has averaged 155 runs (162, if  the 7 over reduced game is omitted). At the last T20WC, at end of 12 games the average score was 149 for the team batting first.

When considering both innings, there have been 8 occasion when teams scored more than 170 runs.

The Scoring Rate for the Tournament is 1.70 runs per ball.

A Boundary has been scored every 6.36.

To date only Pakistan has won the toss and the game.

There have been 20 Dropped Catches. Fourteen of these missed catches were  by  lower ranked teams (including Zimbabwe and Bangaladesh). 10 of these dropped catches came before the 10th over, and 10 came after the 10th over.

Of the 134 wickets that have fallen in 12 games, spinners (including part-time spinners) have taken 45 of these (33.58%).

There have been 12Maiden overs: 3 came while batting first and 7 came between the 6-10 over period.

The Top 4 batters in each team have contributed 67.36% of the total team’s score.

Scoring more than 50 runs : out of 26  scores of more than 50, openers have scored 4 of them.  18 of the 50+ scores came while chasing.

Partnerships: there have been seventeen 50+ partnerships, 5 were for the opening stand (4 came while chasing). The average opening stand is 28.00.

Phases of the game: average runs scored at end of 6 overs is 45. This is the best in two years. The average falls to 65 at the end of the 10th over. It increases to 100 at end of 15th over. The bottleneck appears to be between the 7th and 10th overs where batsmen slow down (while chasing). 5 maiden overs were bowled in this period.

Big overs (more than 10 runs): in the first five games of the Tournament, there was very little action (especially for the team to bat first) in the first 6 overs of the innings. Very few ‘big overs’ were conceded. During these first 5 games, in the power play the first team tobat saw only 6.67% (2/30 Overs) of big overs and overall it was 16.67% (10/60 Overs ). The total big overs in all 20 overs was  23.50%(47/200 Overs).

Here is what happened after 12 games. Below is percentile of big overs (> 10runs/over) in each phase.

Phases 1st Bat 2nd Bat Total
0-6 overs26.38%25.75%26.10%
7-10overs26.66%10.81%19.50%
11-15overs30.90%23.30%27.60%
16-20 overs50.84%44.00%48.80%

Average runs scored have been:

Over

Avg runs in each over 1st Bat

Average runs in each over 2nd bat

1

5.33

5.91

2

5.92

7.82

3

6.92

7.45

4

6.5

9.82

5

11.4

7.91

6

8.92

6.45

7

6.83

5.18

8

8.09

5.7

9

8.27

6.2

10

7.09

5.9

11

6.27

5.44

12

6

7.11

13

9.73

6

14

8.64

8

15

7.91

6.63

16

7.18

9.71

17

9.55

10

18

9.45

6.5

19

13.2

10.3

20

12.7

4.5

 

Implications?

If top order batsmen can keep their heads, and not lose more than 1 wicket in the powerplay, a score above 150 can be achieved. A score of 170 will be challenging, and is an equivalent of 300 score in ODIs.

For bowlers apart from picking up early wickets, the key for them would between the 6th and 10th overs, where they can strike hard and bowl maiden overs which will elevate the asking rate to more than 10 runs per over and climbing, as they reach last phase.

Photo Credit

Waiting for 3rd umpire’s decision