Meeting James and Friends

James Neill is hosting a Wiki Workshop on Friday 14 September (schedule) in the Teaching Commons at the University of Canberra.

He has invited Laura Hale and me to talk briefly about the HoPAu Project.

I thought I would share these slides with the group. (I have a copy on Speaker Deck too.)

Postscript

Shortly after writing this post, this wiki book appeared about Australia and all the Australian athletes at the Games (90Mb download). Laura Hale has produced a HOPAU at London Paralympics report about the Project too.

Photo Credit

Ghost Detector Workshop -Psychogeophysics

Critical Care Nursing: Sharing Insights

I had the good fortune to work with some remarkable critical care nurses today.

We were exploring how to develop a Wikiversity resource to support continuing professional development.

I feel more comfortable each time I use Wikiversity but I have lots to learn. I am hoping that this project will help me do so.

James Neill is helping with the back office part of this project and the whole idea is the brainchild of Holly Northam.

I am hopeful that this project will have the energy exuded by Ian Miller in his blogging.

Ian aims with his eclectic mix of reflections, tutorials and articles to:

educate, to stimulate some introspection, to inform and amuse. More importantly, they are offered in the hope that they might be used as a jumping off point to inspire other nurses to think about their own practice, to explore the latest research, best practice guidelines, and to search out and deepen their knowledge, improving the quality of care they deliver.

Open Language

UCNISS submitted an open tender to the Australian Paralympic Committee this week.

We submitted a proposal to produce A History of the Paralympic Movement in Australia, and to establish a repository of media and digitised primary resources to compliment the text.

The tender was written as a Wikiversity page.

The process of becoming open has been a great personal learning experience. I am fortunate to have had Leigh Blackall and James Neill as my guides and to access Stephen Downes’ OLDaily to extend my horizons.

Stephen has presented his ideas on The Role of Open Educational Resources in Personal Learning this week. I liked his discussion of a language of open learning:

  • We have to stop treating online resources as though they were ‘content’
  • The people who actually use them have moved far beyond that
  • These artifacts constitute a new language; they are a large, complex, post-linguistic vocabulary
  • That’s why they need to be open

Our open tender has received a great deal of interest and comment. The objections to the project we are proposing to the Australian Paralympic Committee underscore for me how important it is to revisit and develop the forms an open language may take.

I am still waiting for the arrival of Stanley Fish’s book in my local bookshop and hope the issues raised there will help me develop my open language and practice.

Advocacy of openness requires many literacies. I am keen to explore how the form of our writing contributes to the flourishing of a sustainable, collaborative approach to the produsing of open educational resources.