Sharing insights and decision-making experiences

Braidwood is my St Mary Mead and Lake Wobegon.

It is a place where I can ponder events way beyond this small rural New South Wales town and connect with them through events in the town.

This weekend, the Braidwood Festival has been helping me reflect on thoughts about insights and decision-making shared by Jacquie Tran.

Jacquie’s presentation, From insights to decisions: Knowledge sharing in sports analytics, has stimulated lots of interest and conversations. One of the observations Jacquie has made is:

Enter Braidwood into this conversation.

This weekend, the Festival of Braidwood has included an airing of quilts, an Art on the Farms exhibition, and open gardens. All of these have a synchronicity with Jacquie’s discussion. I have two examples from the weekend to illustrate the points Jacquie is making.

The first is from on of the exhibits, an upholstered chair by Heidi Horwood.

In the exhibition catalogue, Heidi writes:

The chair was found in a shed on a farm in Braidwood in a state of considerable disrepair. Many of the fabrics that make the patchwork in this project are very old and sourced in Braidwood. … I love the sense of history in old chairs and imagine the comfort they have brought.

The second is from a the Linden Garden at Jembaicumbene. The gardeners there have transformed the garden in five years. They have planted trees, herbaceous borders and found ways to manage limited resources in a windswept location.

The garden draws inspiration from landscape designer Nicole de Vesian, who at 70 translated her experience as a designer for Hermes to create her garden, La Louve in Provence.

I hope both examples add to the conversation Jacquie has started about insights. In both of them there is a bisociation occuring. Arthur Koestler said of bisociation “The discoveries of yesterday are the truisms of tomorrow, because we can add to our knowledge but cannot subtract from it.”

Having a sense of who we were and who we are gives us opportunities to consider how we will be. I see this a profoundly shared experience.

I wonder what you think.

Photo Credits

Braidwood (Jack Featherstone)

Jack Bourke shearing (Katie Lyons, Art on Farms)

Chair (Heidi Horwood)

Linden Garden (Braidwood Open Gardens)

Bedervale (Keith Lyons, CC BY 4.0)

Sharing insights

Jacqie Tran gave a presentation at the recent Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand pre-conference. Her presentation was titled From insights to decisions: Knowledge sharing in sports analytics and has been uploaded to Slideshare.

I thought this was a great topic to choose. It is an excellent way to share a learning journey and invite others to reflect on their practices.

I have been following Jacquie’s work for a number of years and see her as a very important voice in a community of practice that I hope might become a sport version of the R-Ladies movement.

R-Ladies is a diversity initiative that aims “to achieve proportionate representation by encouraging, inspiring, and empowering people of genders currently underrepresented in the R community”. I believe sport needs this too.

I have grabbed three slides from Jacquie’s presentation (in her delightful sketchnote style) to acknowledge the significance of the issues she was raising:

I have always thought that this sharing required social skills that historically have been described as ‘soft’ skills. In many sport science contexts, certainly in the foundation years of the discipline, these skills were disparaged. This is changing …

Which means we can start talking about:

Glueing needs some patience. I think it involves following, advocating, leading and sharing. In my qualitative research terms, it takes lots of time ‘being around‘ in sport contexts.

Jacquie and her generation have remarkable skills to contribute to this glue work. I trust that her open sharing of her ideas stimulates substantial conversations about the social synapses that make it possible to share insights with decision-makers that transform performance.

Photo Credit

Jacquie Tran (Jacquie Tran website)

A Fra Mauro kind of week

Fra Mauro was a cartographer. He lived in the Republic of Venice in the fifteenth century.

I found out about him in James Cowan’s (1997) A Mapmaker’s Dream. In that account, Fra Mauro welcomed visitors from all over the world in his monastery and used their news to develop his map of the world.

I loved the idea that he could be in Venice and yet be connected with voyages of discovery and established trade routes.

I had a Fra Mauro feeling this week in rural New South Wales. Social media, particularly Twitter, brought me news of adventures elsewhere.

Jacquie Tran was on her way to a Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand conference:

Javier Fernandez was at a conference:

Mark Upton was writing about returning ‘home’ in South Australia after all his travels. In his discussion of living in fellowship he wrote “We DO need to balance and share power by exploring the dynamic interaction of leadership and followship” (original emphasis).

By serendipity, I met Jo Gibson, who lives just 50 kms away. Jo is researching leadership and followership in the dynamic way that Mark advocates. I have the good fortune to be her PhD supervisor.

I ended my week, delighted in reading a quote from Albert Mundet far away in Spain: “We compete in the short term, but we may cooperate at longer term”.

From a Fra Mauro perspective, this sharing is immensely powerful.

For many years, I have hoped that open sharing is the new competitive edge and that through sharing we transform sport in the ways that about which Mark Upton and his colleagues write so eloquently and has been demonstrated so well in New Zealand and Spain this week.

Photo Credit

Venezia (Roberto Defilipi, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)