StatsBomb and Women’s World Cup Football Data

In 2018, StatsBomb announced the release of free data on women’s football (link). The announcement included this observation:

Not only do we believe that analysis of the Women’s game deserves equal attention as the Men’s game, we know that by doing this better, we will improve the overall understanding of the game. We also want to encourage more Women to enter into Analytics, Technology and R&D …

The announcement included a reference to the StatsBomb Resource Centre (link). In 2019, StatsBomb provided open data from the Women’s World Cup (link) and indicated the importance of the use of R in deciphering these data (link).

StatsBomb noted:

We’d like this to be as approachable as possible for as many people as possible. We want you to feel comfortable jumping in and having a play around. With that in mind, we’ve put together a little primer for working with our data in the R programming language.

StatsBomb has created the StatsBombR package (link) and is shared as a repository on GitHub. The package requires a User Agreement (link) that notes “StatsBomb have made this data freely available and accessible to encourage and facilitate research and the shared analytical understanding of the game of Football. This is aimed to be a research tool, and is intended to be used as such”.

Information about the StatsBombR package can be found on GitHub (link). An example of the use of these data can be found in the FCrSTATS Github repository (link) including some getting started guidelines (link). Ryo Nakagawara has been using ggplots with some of these data (link) and shared them with #TidyTuesday visualisations (link).

Photo Credit

Officiating (FIFA’s Women’s World Cup)

Looking at win probability

A picture taken from the FFA Twitter feed.

I was following some data live on the Australia v Brazil group game at the 2019 FIFA World Cup (link).

It was the first time I had noticed that a Live Win Probability was being used in this way and I decided to track it with a Google Sheet of my own (link).

By the time I had reached the graph, Brazil scored a penalty in the 27th minute (Martha) and a second goal in the 38th minute (Cristiana). I am using an Elo measurement at this Tournament to assess probability based on not losing if a higher rated team scores first. Based on these two goals, the probability of Brazil not losing was moving towards at least 0.8 out of 1.

As I watched the graph progress towards half time, Australia scored (Foord). I wondered how the probability graph might respond … and what both coaches might do at half time. I did think the late Australian goal in the half might add an interesting stage in the probability of game outcome given that Australia was the higher rated Elo team in this game.

At the start of the second half, the Brazilian coach replaced Martha with Ludmila (a loss of approximately 120 caps) and Formiga with Luana (Luana Bertolucci Paixão) (a loss of approximately 150 caps) . Australia made no changes. Brazil conceded a long range goal in the 58th minute (Logarzo) and an own goal in the 66th minute (the goal was confirmed by the Video Assistant Referee (VAR, link)). Australia won the game 3v2.

I wondered how we might factor these dynamics into our visualisations and augment our machine intelligence with a reciprocal understanding about game playing in activity that has its own as well as general time series momentum. A paper by Michael Lopez and his colleagues (link) has set me off thinking about these dynamics.

Given the growth in the use of these visualisations, I do think these are very important conversations to be having now.


Photo Credit

This game is wild (Matildas, Twitter)

Performance at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup: Knockout Games

The teams that qualified for the Knockout Stage of the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup in FIFA World Ranking order (18 March 2011) were:

  • USA (1)
  • Germany (2)
  • Brazil (3)
  • Japan (4)
  • Sweden (5)
  • France (7)
  • England (10)
  • Australia (11)

In the Knockout Stage:

26 goals were scored in the 8 games played.

The team that scored first won 5 games out of the 8 games played.

Exceptions

England (FIFA Rank 10) scored first against France (7) but lost (in a penalty shoot out after extra time was played).

Sweden (5) scored first against Japan (4) and lost.

USA (1) scored first against Japan (4) but lost (in a penalty shoot out after extra time was played).

The higher FIFA ranked team won 6 of the 8 games played:

Exceptions

Germany (2) lost to Japan (4)

USA (1) lost to Japan (4)

Goals scored in the Knockout Stage (team scoring goal in bold with link to video of the goals):

2 DAIANE (USA v Brazil) (own goal)

9 Lauren CHENEY (USA v France)

10 Josefine OQVIST (Sweden v Japan)

11 Therese SJOGRAN (Sweden v Australia)

16 Lisa DAHLKVIST (Sweden v Australia)

19 Nahomi KAWASUMI (Japan v Sweden)

29 Lotta SCHELIN (Sweden v France)

40 Ellyse PERRY (Australia v Sweden)

52 Lotta SCHELIN (Sweden v Australia)

55 Sonia BOMPASTOR (France v USA)

56 Elodie THOMIS (France v Sweden)

59 Jill SCOTT (England v France)

60 Homare SAWA (Japan v Sweden)

64 Nahomi KAWASUMI (Japan v Sweden)

68 MARTA (Brazil v USA)

69 Alex MORGAN (USA v Japan)

79 Abby WAMBACH (USA v France)

81 Aya MIYAMA (Japan v USA)

82 Alex MORGAN (USA v France)

82 Maria HAMMARSTROM (Sweden v France)

88 Elise BUSSAGLIA (France v England)

Extra Time Goals

92 MARTA (Brazil v USA) (Penalty)

104 Abby WAMBACH (USA v Japan)

108 Karina MARUYAMA (Japan v Germany)

117 Homare SAWA (Japan v USA)

120+2 Abby WAMBACH (USA v Brazil)

Penalty Shoot Outs

There were 3 penalty shoot outs in the Knockout Stage two in the quarter finals and one in the final:

France defeated England 4-3. France took the first penalty. Sequence:

0-0 (France miss), 0-1, 1-1, 1-2, 2-2, 2-3, 3-3, 3-3 (England miss), 4-3, 4-3 (England miss).

USA defeated Brazil 5-3. USA took the first penalty. Sequence:

1-0, 1-1, 2-1, 2-2, 3-2, 3-2 (Brazil miss), 4-2, 4-3, 5-3.

Japan defeated USA 3-1. USA took the first penalty. Sequence:

0-0 (USA miss), 0-1, 0-1 (USA miss), 0-1 (Japan miss), 0-1 (USA miss), 0-2, 1-2, 1-3.

Referees in the Knockout Stage:

Jenny Palmqvist (SWE) England v France (2 goals scored)

Quetzalli Avarado (MEX) Japan v Germany (1 goal)

Silvia Reyes (PER) Sweden v Australia (4 goals)

Jacqui Melksham (AUS) Brazil v USA (4 goals)

Kirsi Heikkinen (FIN) France v USA (4 goals)

Carol Anne CHENARD (CAN) Japan v Sweden (4 goals)

Kari SEITZ (USA) Sweden v France (3 goals)

Bibiana STEINHAUS (GER) Japan v USA (4 goals)