Sharing news

Each week an O’Reilly newsletter arrives in my email inbox. I am not sure when I signed up but I am delighted I did.

This week the newsletter brought an article by Avinash Kaushik titled Responses to Negative Data (link). In it, Avinash discusses the reception of negative news and four data leadership archetypes:

  • Bubble
  • Attacker
  • Rationaliser
  • Curious

I found the Curious leadership description particularly interesting. Avinash suggests that Curious Ones have two critical attributes: they demonstrate open mindedness in the face of negative data; and they look forward.

I am particularly intrigued by the feedforward aspect of curiosity in changing times. Avinash contextualised this in his opening remark: “A decade ago, data people delivered a lot less bad news because so little could be measured with any degree of confidence”.

His next sentence encouraged me to think in pedagogical and practice terms how we might support those who are learning to analyse data carefully and thoughtfully: “In 2019, we can measure the crap out of so much. Even with the limitations of tools, government regulations, and the astonishing fragmentation of everything (attention, devices, consumption sources, identities and more)”.

I am starting to imagine all sort of learning scenarios where the ‘leader’ can receive news and respond stereotypically … and the conversations we might have to share news effectively.

Photo Credit

Photo by N. on Unsplash

#UCSIA15 Connections, Nodes and Wormholes

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Last week, Stephen Downes wrote about Becoming MOOC.

The concluding paragraph of his post is:

Learning in a MOOC and literacy in a MOOC become synonymous. We are not acquiring content or using language and literacy, we are becoming literate, becoming MOOC. Each bit of experience, each frustrated facing of a new chaos, changes you, shapes you. Participating in a MOOC is like walking through a forest, trying to see where animals have walked in the past, trying to determine whether that flash of orange is a tiger. There are no easy successes, and often no sense of flow. But you feel the flush of success every time you recognize a form you defined, achieve a skill you needed, and gradually gradually you become a skilled inhabitant of the forest, or of 21st century human society.

I thought this was an excellent statement of #UCSIA15 ambitions.

I read Stephen’s post after reading Chris Daly’s tribute to David Carr’s teaching. Chris wrote:

When David died, he was the holder of an endowed chair in the Journalism Department at Boston University. There he was, inventing himself all over again. Far from the places in Washington and New York where he had made his bones, David was putting himself on the line to try something new.

And he was not just dabbling. He took it seriously, and from what he revealed, he was dead-serious about teaching. He saw teaching as another way to do most of the things he cared about — writing, thinking, criticizing, and nurturing this thing that we all care about so much.

Chris and David’s students share how David adapted to his teaching role. I thought his wisdom and approach to pedagogy shone through his Press Play course.

 David wrote of Press Play:

This course, Press Play, aspires to be a place where you make things. Good things. Smart things. Cool things. And then share those things with other people. The idea of Press Play is that after we make things we are happy with, that we push a button and unleash it on the world. Much of it will be text, but if you want to make magic with a camera, your phone, or with a digital recorder, knock yourself out. But it will all be displayed and edited on Medium because there will be a strong emphasis on working with others in this course, and Medium is collaborative.

With just a few more sleeps to the start of #UCSIA15, David, Chris and Stephen have helped me clarify not only the aims of the course but also helped confirm some of the opportunities for #UCSIA15:

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Modesty and Humility

We recognise that there is so much expertise and experience available in sport informatics and analytics. Our course is a very small contribution to remarkable communities of practice. We understand that we are offering a local perspective and hope that we can contribute to a global discussion of such a dynamic field of study and practice. We see the course as a wonderful opportunity for our own learning about open sharing.

Connecting

We believe the way to develop knowledge of sport informatics and analytics is to connect with others. We have described this course as a connectivist course. Stephen Downes (2007) points out that:

At its heart, connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks.

We hope that our course will make connecting and sharing possible. We think this can happen within the course and in existing self-organising networks.

Nodes

Rita Kop and Adrian Hill (2008) observe:

In the connectivist model, a learning community is described as a node, which is always part of a larger network.  Nodes arise out of the connection points that are found on a network.  A network is comprised of two or more nodes linked in order to share resources.  Nodes may be of varying size and strength, depending on the concentration of information and the number of individuals who are navigating through a particular node

We hope that our choice of four themes for #UCSIA15 and mapped with Mindmeister mindmaps indicate the potential for node development in sport informatics and analytics.

We think there are enormous opportunities to share the practice of these nodes and to alert others to their interests and passions.

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Wormholes

#UCSIA15 has been planned as an asynchronous, non-linear course. We are hoping that participants’ interests will take them where they wish within and beyond the course.

We anticipate that some participants may have a single interest that they wish to pursue.

We trust that some of the content might lead to different spacetime. Wikipedia notes that a wormhole “is much like a tunnel with two ends, each in separate points in spacetime”.

Whilst this might seem an ambitious aspiration one of our topics is feedforward. Recent research in that field has discussed the possibilities of mental time travel.

In a 2012 paper, Peter Dowrick suggests:

The most rapid learning by humans can be achieved by mental simulations of future events, based on reconfigured preexisting component skills. These reconsiderations of learning from the future, emphasizing learning from oneself, have coincided with developments in neurocognitive theories of mirror neurons and mental time travel.

Photo Credits

Crowd in Railway Station (Matthias Ripp, CC BY 2.0)

Tilt shift grid (Mike Edwards, CC BY 2.0)

Soldier Field Tilt Shift (Michael Baird, CC BY-SA 2.0)

#OAPS101: Enhancing Performance

Introduction

(Vocaroo Summary of this post)

I have really enjoyed Week 1 of the small open online course Observing and Analysing Performance in Sport.

There have been some fascinating exchanges particularly about Seeing and Observing and Decision Making.

The numbers of participants enrolled in the course has increased this week. Shortly before the course started we had 155 and now it is 374. This means it is still a small open online course. I have discussed the approach taken in the course in a number of Clyde Street posts and in this Day 1 post on OpenLearning.

I have been keen to offer Open Badges for the course.

Conversations in the first week have prompted me to think about:

  • Feedforward
  • Performances of Understanding
  • Personal Learning Environments

 

Will Oldham’s post Analysts as Educators acted as a catalyst for my thoughts. In a post that synthesises a variety of ideas, Will concludes that:

We must take be confident enough in our skills and abilities that we are able to provide assurance to those who require it that we can add value to established coaching setups and processes, that we’re not in the business of coaching revolutions, but simply the development of athletes and coaches.

I commented on his post and suggest that the value we add is as educational technologists. I should have added that wherever possible bring an interdisciplinary understanding to performance. I think this requires a sensitivity to a narrative of performance that is customised to athletes and coaches.

My three big issues for the first week:

Feedforward

What if performance analysts decide to share the world as it might be?

I think feedfoward gives us the opportunity to do this. In Peter Dowrick’s wordssubjects see themselves not so much as they were but as they might be“.

Performances of Understanding

Last year I wrote about Sam Stosur’s victory in the US Open Tennis. In that post I noted that “I am fascinated by the process by which athletes prepare to perform. I am fascinated too by the realisation of the readiness to perform in actual performance”. My ideas about performances of understanding help me think about this readiness.

A decade ago I followed a Harvard University course online, Teaching for Understanding Using New Technologies. In that course performances of understanding were important indicators. Such performances:

… require students to go beyond the information given to create something new by reshaping, expanding, extrapolating from, applying, and building on what they already know. The best performances of understanding help students both develop demonstrate their understanding.

Personal Learning Environments

I am hopeful that many of the participants in the Observing and Analysing Performance in Sport course will write about their experiences as performance analysts or their interests in performance analysis. There is so much experience to share.

I am keen to find out about personal learning environments. My participation in the CCK08 course opened my eyes to the benefits of sharing openly. I have written about personal learning environments since that course. I see personalisation as one of the ways to offer a service to athletes and coaches.

Into Week 2

I am looking forward to Week 2 of #OAPS101. I am hopeful that this post might stimulate discussion that goes beyond the content of the course and helps address some second order questions about performance analysis.

Photo Credit

I received the photograph in this blog post from a friend. I have been unable to find a source for it. I am keen to learn whether it is a Creative Commons Licensed image.