Graduation 2011

The University of Canberra is holding its 2011 Graduation Ceremonies in the Great Hall of Parliament.

Yesterday evening I attended the Faculty of Health’s Ceremony.

The Hall was packed with graduands from the Faculty of Health and the Faculty of Applied Science.

Whenever I process at a graduation ceremony and have the privilege to sit on the platform I am reminded about the feelings I had at my graduation in York in 1973.

The Great Hall was packed with parents, family and friends last night. It is wonderful to be at an event that overflows pride and happiness.

Amongst those graduating were:

  • Fifteen graduands from the Bachelor of Coaching Science degree.
  • Three Honours’ students in Sport Studies.
  • Seventeen graduands in the Bachelor of Sports Management.
  • Sixteen graduands in the Bachelor of Sports Media.
  • Twelve graduands in joint sport degrees.

The student speaker at the ceremony was Lisa Kelly. Lisa was the recipient of the Herbert Burton Medal awarded to a graduating student “deemed to have achieved outstanding academic results coupled with a significant contribution in any of a variety of ways to the wider community”.

The guest speaker was Tom Calma. Tom is a member of the University’s Council. He spoke about collaboration and respect and shared with the 2011 graduates the power of working together to be leaders in our communities.

The formalities of the evening ended with Tom’s speech and thereafter it was off to informal celebrations for the graduates, families and friends.

I drove home to Mongarlowe thinking about the brightness of all the graduates eyes on receiving their degrees and thinking back to my family day in 1973 in a different Great Hall in York when I became the first graduate in my family.

Discussing a Teaching Nursing Home Bid

We are discussing a bid for a Teaching Nursing Home at the University of Canberra today.

The discussions are being hosted and facilitated by Laurie Grealish.

Laurie has been working with Leigh Blackall to develop a Wikiversity page for the bid.

What has delighted me about the day has been the use of a Wikiversity open access page and Leigh’s use of UStream to webcast proceedings and MeetingWords to note discussion points..

There are a number of community groups involved in the workshop and it seems to me that the openness of the bid is a great model for community sharing and consumer directed care. This blog post is a contribution to that sharing.

The program for the day is:

13.00 Welcome, introductions 

Overview of the forum

 

Associate Professor Laurie Grealish, Chair
1315 UC and Engagement with the Capital Region Mr Lewis Jones, Executive Director, Office of Development, University of Canberra 

 

1330 Ageing and aged care in Australia Professor Diane Gibson, Dean Faculty of Health, University of Canberra 

 

1350 Preliminary work: Issues in residential aged care & Teaching Nursing Home Models Associate Professor Laurie Grealish 

 

1410 What could be done in the ACT Capital Region within a formal collaborative framework, known as the Teaching Nursing Home? 

 

Small group work
1440 Reporting back and discussion 

 

15.00 Afternoon tea 

 

15.15 What possible hurdles may exist? How might we address them at this early planning stage? 

 

Small group work
15.45 Reporting back and discussion 

 

16.10 Summary of the day: Where to next Associate Professor Laurie Grealish, Chair

Writing Week Outputs

This year’s Faculty of Health‘s 2010 Writing Week at the University of Canberra has produced a number of outputs.

I have posted about two workshops held to support the week:

Three colleagues have edited and submitted (eight) papers to journals this week, one colleague has completed two chapters for an international handbook, one colleague has delivered three reports, five colleagues have taken the opportunity to work on drafts of PhD chapters, one colleague has written a new course and a team of colleagues has submitted a large grant application.

I have written up a paper from 1993 and posted it on this blog. My aim was to share some ideas from the early years of notational analysis in sport. I hope I raise some important epistemological and ontological issues in the paper and see it as a contribution to the sociology of knowledge about notational and performance analysis. I have developed a wiki for a UNHCR project.

At the end of the week a colleague shared with me a link to the video of J K Rowling’s Commencement Address at Harvard:

Her 2008 talk was titled The Fringe Benefits of Failure, and the Importance of Imagination. In it she shares some insights about her exoerience. I thought this was a great way to end our week:

Ultimately, we all have to decide for ourselves what constitutes failure, but the world is quite eager to give you a set of criteria if you let it. So I think it fair to say that by any conventional measure, a mere seven years after my graduation day, I had failed on an epic scale. An exceptionally short-lived marriage had imploded, and I was jobless, a lone parent, and as poor as it is possible to be in modern Britain, without being homeless. The fears that my parents had had for me, and that I had had for myself, had both come to pass, and by every usual standard, I was the biggest failure I knew.

Now, I am not going to stand here and tell you that failure is fun. That period of my life was a dark one, and I had no idea that there was going to be what the press has since represented as a kind of fairy tale resolution. I had no idea then how far the tunnel extended, and for a long time, any light at the end of it was a hope rather than a reality.

So why do I talk about the benefits of failure? Simply because failure meant a stripping away of the inessential. I stopped pretending to myself that I was anything other than what I was, and began to direct all my energy into finishing the only work that mattered to me. Had I really succeeded at anything else, I might never have found the determination to succeed in the one arena I believed I truly belonged. I was set free, because my greatest fear had been realised, and I was still alive, and I still had a daughter whom I adored, and I had an old typewriter and a big idea. And so rock bottom became the solid foundation on which I rebuilt my life.

Here’s to big ideas!

 

Photo Credits

Writing a Composition

Untitled

Write till you drop