Separated and Connected

509Earlier this morning I was corresponding with a friend from Estonia. Early morning rural Australia fits in well with late night Tallinn.

We were discussing how to share information with coaches and support staff. It is a topic that is at the forefront of my thinking at the moment and I have used recent posts to explore some ideas and links.

After saying goodnight to Tallinn, I started working through some of my feeds and found a treasure trove of connections.

From Paper.Li I was directed to a post by Keri-Lee Beasley about Twitter: A Cultural Guidebook. Keri-Lee acknowledges a range of people who helped with the project to produce the Guidebook and I noted her reference to Rodd Lucier.

In a post last year, Rodd looked at Seven Degrees of Connectedness. In the introduction to his post, Rodd asks “What’s the most significant event that causes you to pay closer attention to the learners in your network?” In answer to his own question, Rodd replies:

For me, it is meeting face-to-face. I’m more attuned to those people in my learning network whose voices are amplified because we met at a conference; exchanged stories; shared a meal. Fleshed out by personality and attitude, I find myself savouring the words and ideas I consume online.

  • Lurker (“Hey other people are sharing some cool ideas on their blogs”.)
  • Novice (“When I join in on the conversation people actually talk back to me.”)
  • Insider (“I’m beginning to know many of these familiar names and faces.”)
  • Colleague (“I rely on my network for the most important news.”)
  • Collaborator (“Why don’t we start a Google Doc to share our ideas?”)
  • Friend (“It feels like we’ve known one another for a long time.”)
  • Confidant (“I would rather talk to you in person, can you just call me.”)

Keri-Lee and Rodd reminded me of the discussion of three degrees of influence. In December 2008, James Fowler and Nicholas Christakis published “The Dynamic Spread of Happiness in a Large Social Network: Longitudinal Analysis Over 20 Years in the Framingham Heart Study,” in the British Medical Journal (337: a2338 (December 2008); doi:10.1136/bmj.a2338). In her review of the paper, Christine Nyholm observes “happy person can trigger a chain reaction that benefits friends, friends’ friends and friends’ friends’ friends”.

This is an interesting interface between connectedness and separateness. At the moment, I am finding the Paper.Li feed a very productive way of enjoying happiness at three removes. The same goes for Diigo.

For example, this morning a link from the Teacher-Librarian group took me to Greg Miller’s post, How do we measure a competency? Greg’s post is a delightful synthesis of some #21stedchat conversations. Greg provides links to some interesting documentation and summarises the conversations thus:

Many involved in the chat agreed that there needs to be a move toward students demonstrating their learning in more authentic ways, aligning with real-world situations. An emphasis on choice, performance assessments, portfolio building, and student-led conferences all came up as high yield strategies to better support the kind of learning needed today.  It was inspiring to hear from the many educators who are pushing the envelope with both learning and assessment.  Their ideas were both innovative and practical.

Greg links to a graphic from Alberta’s new Framework for Student Learning:

21st-century-1entejd1

 I am going to follow up on Greg’s discussion of a 21st-century-skills-report-card. (Greg acknowledges @PaulSolarz from Illinois in the use of this card.)
My morning’s reading ended with a visit to Rick Anderson’s Scholarly Kitchen post, The Shadow of the MOOC Grows Longer. Rick’s post prompted a comment by Rahim Rajan:
I think the real “disruption” is the effect that the MOOCs are having in initiating conversations on hundreds of campuses across the nation about the role (and need) for innovative technologies in teaching and learning – particularly as a replacement for large, impersonal entry level courses that have low success rates. The real opportunity for innovative campuses will be in leveraging these MOOCs for blended and flipped instruction. MOOCs are also forcing the question on campuses about the need for continuous improvement and course re-design, as well as issues surrounding non-traditional learners (now a majority of higher ed students) and cost/affordability. It’s very early days and no doubt these platforms and online courses will continue to evolve and change. In my opinion, MOOCs represent one of a number of innovations born in the cauldrons of the technology and internet revolution that will permanently change education.

Rahim gave his twitter account as the link to his profile. He is a Gates Foundation Program Officer focusing on e-learning and innovative educational technology; helping college students learn, succeed, and complete. Which provides me with another opportunity to negotiate separation and connection.

I am off to buy an electrical bike which might be a good metaphor for this conversation. The bike will help negotiate hills en route to face-to-face meetings – technology enriched wayfinding.

 

Photo Credit

Frame Grab from attempt to download the Cultural Guidebook.

 

Visualising Olympic Performance

I receive a daily update from the Diigo Teacher-Librarian Group.

Yesterday Cathy Oxley shared three Olympic resources with Group members.

All three have an interesting approach to visualising Olympic performance.

SBS

SBS has produced a medals results page for all the Olympic Games in the modern era.

It appears as a map of the world.

The 2012 graphic is:

The medals for the first Olympic Games of the modern era were:

The New York Times

The New York Times has a visualisation of all medalists in three events in the modern era:

Performances are presented relative to Usain Bolt’s 2012 Olympic record.

I think this interactive visualisation is remarkable. It has set a new standard in how we share information about athletic performance.

The Slate

The Slate brings together eight contestants in four events (the 100-metres sprint, 100-metre freestyle swim, the long jump, and the discus) to bring together athletes from different Olympic eras (1896 to 2008).

 

I think these are wonderful resources. I am very impressed by the SBS medal selector and mesmerised by the New York Times visualisation … all thanks to Cathy Oxley’s links.

 

 

 

Cirrus 111203

A brief Cirrus post to end the week.

I read with interest news of a Little Printer via a Scholarly Kitchen post. Berg has produced the printer and reports that:

Little Printer wirelessly connects (with no configuration) to a small box that plugs into your broadband router. . . . your phone is your remote control. We think of BERG Cloud as the nervous system for connected products.

There is more information about the Little Printer on Matt Webb’s post.

By coincidence the Scholarly Kitchen page had a link to an interview with Clay Johnson.

Marc Slocum notes that:

Clay Johnson (@cjoh), author of the forthcoming book “The Information Diet,” believes the information overload problem is actually an information consumption problem. In the following interview, Johnson explains how reframing the issue around consumption and taking ownership of our info intake are the keys to finding information balance.

One of my consumption issues is how to curate the information I gather. My cirrus posts are one way of doing this for me. My blog has become a repository. This week I was interested to find Lyn Hay‘s post (via a Diigo Teacher-Librarian Group link) Content curation and the power of collective intelligence. I thought Lyn’s post was an excellent resource for a community of practice keen to connect about curation.

The Teacher-Librarian Group in Diigo brought me news of David Kapuler’s Top 100 websites for 2011. David observes of his list:

I tried to cover a wide range of sites, from flash card creators to digital storytelling and of course, social networks, which really shined in 2011.

Photo Credit

Little Printer