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Separated and Connected

Earlier this morning I was corresponding with a friend from Estonia. Early morning rural Australia fits in well with late night Tallinn. We were discussing how to share information with coaches and support staff. It is a topic that is at the forefront of my thinking at the moment and I have used recent posts to explore some ideas and links. After saying goodnight to Tallinn, I started working through some of my feeds and found a treasure trove of connections. From Paper.Li I was directed to a post by Keri-Lee Beasley about Twitter: A Cultural Guidebook. Keri-Lee acknowledges a range of...

Visualising Olympic Performance

I receive a daily update from the Diigo Teacher-Librarian Group. Yesterday Cathy Oxley shared three Olympic resources with Group members. All three have an interesting approach to visualising Olympic performance. SBS SBS has produced a medals results page for all the Olympic Games in the modern era. It appears as a map of the world. The 2012 graphic is: The medals for the first Olympic Games of the modern era were: The New York Times The New York Times has a visualisation of all medalists in three events in the modern era: Performances are presented relative to Usain Bolt's 2012 Olympic record. I think this interactive visualisation is remarkable. It...

Cirrus 111203

A brief Cirrus post to end the week. I read with interest news of a Little Printer via a Scholarly Kitchen post. Berg has produced the printer and reports that: Little Printer wirelessly connects (with no configuration) to a small box that plugs into your broadband router. . . . your phone is your remote control. We think of BERG Cloud as the nervous system for connected products. There is more information about the Little Printer on Matt Webb's post. By coincidence the Scholarly Kitchen page had a link to an interview with Clay Johnson. Marc Slocum notes that: Clay Johnson (@cjoh), author of the...

Classroom Technology

In November 2000 I was invited to give a presentation to a national conference of educators on the topic of Information and Communications Technology in Physical Education. There is a link to this presentation on SlideShare. I was reminded of this presentation when I received a Plurking Educators Diigo link from Grace Kat. Grace pointed to a post on The Evolution of Classroom Technology. The technologies included there: Horn Book (1650) Ferule Magic Lantern School Slate Chalkboard Pencil (1900) Stereoscope Film Projector (1925) Radio Overhead Projector (1930) Ballpoint Pen Mimeograph Headphones (1950) Slide Rule Videotapes Reading Accelerator Skinner Teaching Machine Educational Television (1958) Photocopier Liquid Paper Filmstrip Viewer (1965) Handheld Calculator (1970) Scantron Plato Computer CD Rom Drive (1985) Handheld Graphing Calculator Interactive Whiteboard (1999) Iclicker XO Laptop iPad (2010) At the time...

Fossicking in the Social Web

According to Wikipedia, fossicking is a term found in Cornwall and Australia referring to prospecting. "This can be for gold, precious stones, fossils, etc. by sifting through a prospective area. In Australian English, the term has an extended use meaning to rummage." My engagement with the social web is akin to rummaging but through trusted networks I do find rich seams of resources and opportunities. Recently (thanks to Diigo) I have rummaged through: Gist kimtag Soundtrckr Mashboard MapMyWalk Nuvixa Journamatic Sendoid webdoc Embedly TikiToki Livebinders Linkable This morning (thanks to Stephen Downes) Crocdoc and Osmek. Of late I have not been visiting Twitter or Facebook but know that they are there. I have started to use LinkedIn...

It Is Personal

A few days ago I received a link to Paul Adam's Real Life Social Network v2 presentation at Voices That Matter Web Design Conference held in San Francisco in June 2010. My link came from a Diigo list. I am surprised how long it took me to catch up with this presentation. I was the 614,122nd visitor to Paul's SlideShare presentation. The metrics for his presentation are fascinating: I am fortunate that I got there after Tim Greenhalgh. He commented: This is one of 'the' definitive Social Media presentations. Just to you let you know that Paul (@padday) has moved on from Google and...

Linking, Connecting, Sharing

Each day I receive a range of links to blogs posts and web tools. A post from the ABC (18 January) alerted me to James Fowler, Jaime Settleb, and Nicholas Christakis' work, Correlated genotypes in friendship networks. Their paper encouraged me to think about linking, connecting and sharing. The abstract of their paper notes that: It is well known that humans tend to associate with other humans who have similar characteristics, but it is unclear whether this tendency has...

Edging to Open Learning in Open Spaces

Last week I had the opportunity to visit Ballarat to discuss Edgeless Challenges and Opportunities. I have been thinking a great deal about learning spaces and the function (rather than the form) of the university of late. In part these thoughts have been stimulated by the University of Canberra's development of teaching and learning commons. This week I have been overwhelmed by the number of connections I am finding in relation to open learning and sharing. Some of these connections include: George Siemens' post (10 December) about Connections, Clouds, Things & Analytics in which he observes that: many universities have an educational...

Accidental Connectivism and the Impulse to Write

Writing has been on my mind a lot lately. Perhaps because I have been thinking about writing I am finding stimuli everywhere and everywhen. I realise that it may be that I am an 'accidental connectivist'. The most recent stimulus was George Siemen's blog post Teaching as transparent learning. In the post George explores the idea of learning by sharing: My work on blogs, articles, handbooks, and so on is an invitation to engage in conversation, not a proclamation of what I absolutely know. He adds that Will Richardson (see, for example, New Reading, New Writing), Terry Anderson, Stephen Downes, Grainne Conole,...

Point of Departure: Food for Thought 1.1 (W to S)

I have been away enjoying the Australian summer but I have been thinking about this post for some time. Last year I posted a list of the sites that nourish my thinking about teaching, learning and educational technology. During 2009 I am going to write about these sites as a synthesis of themes and links. I hope to post once a week to capture something of a week's news and discussions. It is my way of responding to and contributing to communities of practice that are growing by sharing (Kim Marshall, Beth Kanter and Richard Byrne are the most...