3.0, 4.0, 5.0

I have been working through some .0 numbers this week.

3.0

Stephen Downes’ E-Learning 3.0 starts this month. He has provided an overview of the course on his Half and Hour blog. Stephen notes:

The premise of this course is that we are entering the third major phase of the world wide web, and that it will redefine online learning as it has previously.

In the 3.0 web “the central role played by platforms is diminished in favour of direct interactions between peers, that is, a distributed web”.

The course runs from mid-October to mid-December. I am looking forward to taking part in another of Stephen’s courses a decade after CCK08.

4.0

I have been introduced to Leadership 4.0 whilst researching another topic. The Oxford Leadership Group is conducting:

a ‘living research’ project aimed at redefining leadership in the context of … the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The project focuses on how corporations are adapting their leadership style, culture and methodologies in order to innovate and steer the implementations of new business models.

Klaus Schwab has written about the Fourth Industrial Revolution and notes “that all of these new technologies are first and foremost tools made by people for people”.

5.0

I have been working with Tony Charge at Sports Wizard® to develop an idea about qualitative analytics. We have used the 5.0 number to indicate how a fourth industrial revolution might combine with the vibrant, semantic web 3.0 to engage in conversations about intelligence augmentation from a qualitative perspective.

I think the use of 5.0 is ambitious but it does enable a transparent discussion about the analysis and observation of performance. The roots of this 5.0 lie in conversations in the 1950s and 1960s about intelligence amplification and intelligence augmentation. I am hopeful this resonates with other .0 conversations.

Photo Credit

Keith Lyons (CC BY 4.0)