The Second Ashes Cricket Test 2019

The Second Cricket Ashes Test has concluded as a draw (link).

During the test match, Australia had to respond to two England scores of 258 in each innings.

My estimate was that England was required to take a wicket every 26 runs in each innings to win the game and level the test series. My record:

First Innings (Rate 26 Runs per wicket)

Australia were bowled out for 250 runs.

Second Innings (Rate 26 Runs per wicket)

The game ended with an Australian score of 154 for 6 wickets (link).

A Comparison of Both Innings

(Using the gridExtra package)

Winning First

The first Ashes Test was completed at Edgebaston in Birmingham on 5 August (link). Australia won on the final day of the test by 251 runs.

Australia scored 487 runs in their second innings. England required 398 runs to win the game on the final day.

Throughout this cricket summer in England, I have wondered if we can predict the outcome of games early in their play after a team has set a target in an innings.

In this test match, I used Australia’s second innings total as a guide to what England needed to do to bat through the final day. I made the assumption that each partnership for England needed to be 49 runs. I was mindful that England was unlikely to score 496 runs in the day but I did have this linear relationship as a check:

The actual profile on Day 5 was:

These data left me thinking about training and competition and how both teams might prepare for the second test at the Lord’s Cricket Ground in a week’s time.

More generally, the result encouraged me to think about the importance of winning first in a series or a tournament.

Photo Credit

Edgebaston (Craig Stevenson, Twitter)

Citationsy

Stephen Downes shared news of Citationsy (link) this morning.

He observed “This is a lovely product, and with the Firefox extension works seamlessly in my workflow”.

Cenk Özbakır (2017) provided some background to the development of Citationsy (link) as a “reference collection and bibliography creation tool for people who value simplicity, privacy, and speed”.

I think this is a great tool and I tried it immediately after receiving Stephen’s email newsletter. At the time I was looking at road racing in cycling. The three references I used were (link):

My Citationsy link enables me to create projects and share them in the style of an APA 5th Edition format. I have yet to look at the range of options I have with my projects. These include:

Photo Credit

Angelina Litvin on Unsplash