Three posts about analysis and analytics

I have had some time to think about meta issues in performance analysis and analytics. I think this is an exciting and transformational time for this epistemological and ontological domain.

My three posts, written today flowed from a friend’s email in which my friend employed in an institute of sport observed that “the biggest challenge is how we develop and mentor these data people”.

The first post (link) discussed the concept of a sticky campus as a “a digitally-enabled space” and “a learning environment designed to give students everything they need for collaborative and solitary study, and to promote active learning”.

The second post looked at the verbs we use to describe what we do (link). This was prompted by a conjunction of my friend’s email and news of the IBM’s AI Ladder (link). The artificial intelligence ladder has four characteristics: collect; organise; analyse; and infuse.

A third post uses a lens of a critical friend to explore pedagogies and practices in performance analysis and analytics. It uses a seminal paper by Arthur Costa and Bena Kallick (1993) (link) to explore the trusted relationships that grow between friend and analyst. I am particularly interested in the role of a friend is an advocate for success (link). A key point in this post is the investment required by leaders in these learning opportunities “funds should be focused on providing high-quality professional learning experiences”.

Photo Credits

Vintage Sheep Hiking (Lenny K Photography, CC BY 2.0)

Markus Spiske on Unsplash

RLadies London (Twitter)

James Baldwin on Unsplash

Connectivity, Invisibility, Awareness, and Agency

Katrin Etzrodt and Sven Engesser (2019) have been looking at ubiquitous tools, connected things and intelligent agents (link).

Their paper seeks to disentangle the terminology used in discussions of ubiquity. They suggest theoretically disentangling terminology “results in four distinct analytical dimensions (connectivity, invisibility, awareness, and agency) that facilitate and address social implications”.

I enjoyed their discussion of these four concepts and thought they spoke to the discussions we are having about connections in a digital age.

Karen and Sven visualise their disentanglement in Figure 1 in their paper:

They note that in this Figure these dimensions are assigned “to two super-dimensions — connectivity and invisibility deal with aspects of integration, while awareness and agency are concerned with intelligence issues”. They propose that integration “focuses on natural interaction between humans and computers, which is accomplished through invisible technological components and wireless connection”.

Photo Credit

Vivaan Trivedii on Unsplash

My Project

Back in June 2008, I started writing this WordPress blog (link). I had written on other blogs before and had first dipped my toes with Geocities in the late 1990s.

In 2008, I was emboldened by CCK08 (link) to explore thoughts openly about learning in a digital world. I had not considered that what I wrote would be of interest to any other reader. It was framed by the delight of thinking out loud.

This delight in thinking out loud led me to explore many ways to share openly through emerging cloud resources. Many of these accounts remain and include wikis, talks, slides, documents and data. I was even naive enough to start Facebook pages for some of my units.

Another preoccupation of mine has been the linking of ideas about learning, coaching and performing enriched by my formative experiences of social sciences, teacher education, human movement studies, performance analysis and analytics. This has led me to think deeply about how ideas are formed in social contexts. Many of my posts are about how performance analysts and their collaborators emerged at particular times and particular places and constructed knowledge.

My blog at Clyde Street continues to be my platform for this sharing. I hope to add many more posts to the 1800 produced already. My new guide is the R community that is providing exciting ways to share openly and my old guide, the ever inspiring, Stephen Downes (link).

It has been fascinating how this project has emerged and changed.

Photo Credit

Blue sky thinking (Keith Lyons, CC BY 4.0)