3.0, 4.0, 5.0

I have been working through some .0 numbers this week.

3.0

Stephen Downes’ E-Learning 3.0 starts this month. He has provided an overview of the course on his Half and Hour blog. Stephen notes:

The premise of this course is that we are entering the third major phase of the world wide web, and that it will redefine online learning as it has previously.

In the 3.0 web “the central role played by platforms is diminished in favour of direct interactions between peers, that is, a distributed web”.

The course runs from mid-October to mid-December. I am looking forward to taking part in another of Stephen’s courses a decade after CCK08.

4.0

I have been introduced to Leadership 4.0 whilst researching another topic. The Oxford Leadership Group is conducting:

a ‘living research’ project aimed at redefining leadership in the context of … the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The project focuses on how corporations are adapting their leadership style, culture and methodologies in order to innovate and steer the implementations of new business models.

Klaus Schwab has written about the Fourth Industrial Revolution and notes “that all of these new technologies are first and foremost tools made by people for people”.

5.0

I have been working with Tony Charge at Sports Wizard® to develop an idea about qualitative analytics. We have used the 5.0 number to indicate how a fourth industrial revolution might combine with the vibrant, semantic web 3.0 to engage in conversations about intelligence augmentation from a qualitative perspective.

I think the use of 5.0 is ambitious but it does enable a transparent discussion about the analysis and observation of performance. The roots of this 5.0 lie in conversations in the 1950s and 1960s about intelligence amplification and intelligence augmentation. I am hopeful this resonates with other .0 conversations.

Photo Credit

Keith Lyons (CC BY 4.0)

#coachlearninginsport: self-organising networks

Last month, I was invited to join a group of coaches in an online forum.

I was delighted to be asked but I have spent much of the time as a peripheral participant … enjoying the open sharing but not contributing.

I thought listening might be a good way to start in a group of online acquaintances.

Yesterday, I responded to this message from one of the group:

Hi everyone. I’m early in the process of setting up new CPD events. I’ve been slightly dissatisfied with recent experiences and groups like this show the value of sharing and exploring new ideas.

They won’t be linked to NGB/club/County – more of a ‘by coaches, for coaches’ approach focusing on interaction, conceptualisation of ideas and discussion, building a network etc.

From your recent CPD experiences, what have been the best elements? If there was one thing you want, or would want, from a CPD experience then what would it be?

Any ideas and feedback welcome.

It seemed a great opportunity for me to discuss my thoughts about #coachlearninginsport.

It coincided too with my participation in an open online course, Connectivism and Learning. Stephen Downes is the facilitator of this course and he has this to say about connectivism:

At its heart, connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks. (My emphasis)

Elsewhere, Stephen (2012) has discussed course design. He notes that in  a connectivist course “the content does not define the course”.

By navigating the content environment, and selecting content that is relevant to your own personal preferences and context, you are creating an individual view or perspective. So you are first creating connections between contents with each other and with your own background and experience. And working with content in a connectivist course does not involve learning or remembering the content. Rather, it is to engage in a process of creation and sharing. Each person in the course, speaking from his or her unique perspective, participates in a conversation that brings these perspectives together. (My emphasis)

I am hopeful that our online group might discuss these issues … if they are of interest.

For the time being, I look forward to engaging in a conversation on the platform that explores whether we might move from CPD to CPL and to celebrate the sense each of us makes of our self-organising networks.

Connected by shared interests.

Photo Credits

At Coogee (Keith Lyons, CC BY 4.0)

Exploring GitHub: Blue Skies and Stormy Seas

The alternative title for this post is ‘When Amber met Stephen … at Kogarah‘.

I am in Kogarah at the moment and have some time to read and contemplate.

Amber is Amber Thomas. I met her work whilst looking for analyses of open source bike data. Amber has a delightful, detailed discussion about Seattle bike data.

By accident, I noticed Amber’s post about making a website using GitHub pages. This is where the blue sky came into my thinking. I was fascinated by her combination of Blogdown (an RStudio package) that runs using “Hugo” on the GitHub platform.

This is the site she created.

As I was exploring Amber’s creative journey, I received an alert to Stephen Downes’ keynote at SUNY on 9 March. Stephen shared his presentation on Open Learning, Open Networks and I found my way to slide 13. This has a link to a presentation he made last year, Disruptive Innovations in Learning.

Slide 39 in the appropriately named ‘Disruptive’ presentation is where Stephen met Amber at Kogarah. This is the slide freshly clipped:

Today, I have spent much of the day connecting Stephen and Amber’s ideas in GitHub. My aim is to share, contribute and co-create.

What started as a blue sky day, has felt in some very powerful learning moments like this:

There is some calm in the ocean pool at Coogee (not far from Kogarah) but there are some big waves out in the ocean.

I have five repositories in GitHub. The focus of my attention today has been my Portfolio repository. I am hopeful this will become my place to share my digital presence.

It is a very long way from Amber’s creativity. It is also an unsuccessful attempt to use Dean Attali’s insights too.

As ever, I am hopeful that my learning journey becomes a resource for others should they (you) choose to share, contribute and co-create.

It has been that kind of day at Kogarah.

Photo Credits

Sky and Sea (Keith Lyons, CC BY 4.0)

Slide 39 Disruptive Innovations in Learning (Stephen Downes, CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License)