My Project

Back in June 2008, I started writing this WordPress blog (link). I had written on other blogs before and had first dipped my toes with Geocities in the late 1990s.

In 2008, I was emboldened by CCK08 (link) to explore thoughts openly about learning in a digital world. I had not considered that what I wrote would be of interest to any other reader. It was framed by the delight of thinking out loud.

This delight in thinking out loud led me to explore many ways to share openly through emerging cloud resources. Many of these accounts remain and include wikis, talks, slides, documents and data. I was even naive enough to start Facebook pages for some of my units.

Another preoccupation of mine has been the linking of ideas about learning, coaching and performing enriched by my formative experiences of social sciences, teacher education, human movement studies, performance analysis and analytics. This has led me to think deeply about how ideas are formed in social contexts. Many of my posts are about how performance analysts and their collaborators emerged at particular times and particular places and constructed knowledge.

My blog at Clyde Street continues to be my platform for this sharing. I hope to add many more posts to the 1800 produced already. My new guide is the R community that is providing exciting ways to share openly and my old guide, the ever inspiring, Stephen Downes (link).

It has been fascinating how this project has emerged and changed.

Photo Credit

Blue sky thinking (Keith Lyons, CC BY 4.0)

Microcontent: triads, facilitators and a micro-campus

Distant view

Stephen Downes (link) has been exploring microlearning in some of his recent newsletter postings.

Today he has linked to a Paul Greatrix post about the concept of a micro-campus connected to tertiary education’s outreach plans (link).

Stephen points out that in an earlier iteration of this discussion, Stephen himself has considered a triad model to explore this move to a facilitation of learning by a course broker (link).

In my particular area of interest, sport, I see enormous opportunities for co-operation and collaboration in this space. There are so many shared interests in designing and facilitating microlearning to a burgeoning sport ‘industry’ with the learner deciding ‘why?’, ‘when?’, ‘what?’ and ‘how?’

Photo Credit

Giovanni Corti on Unsplash

#EL30 Graphing

Week 3 of Stephen Downes’ E-Learning 3.0 course is looking at Graphs.

Stephen recommended some resources for this topic. These included:

Vaidehi Joshi’s (2017) gentle introduction to graph theory. In her discussion of graphs, Vaidehi observes “in mathematics, graphs are a way to formally represent a network, which is basically just a collection of objects that are all interconnected”.  She distinguishes between directed graphs and undirected graphs and explains the ways edges connect nodes in these kind of graphs. An example of the former is Twitter (each edge created represents a one-way relationship), and of the latter Facebook (its edges are unordered pairs).

Vaidehi suggests a number of resources to provide details about graphs, one of them is Jonathan Cohen’s slide show Graph Traversal. He defines a graph as a “general structure for representing positions with an arbitrary connectivity structure” that has a collection of vertices (nodes) and edges (arcs). An edge connects two vertices and makes them adjacent.

A second resource shared by Stephen is Fjodor Van Veen’s (2016) Neural Network Zoo. In his post Fjodor shares a “mostly complete chart of Neural Networks’ and includes a detailed list of references to support his visualisation of the networks.

A third resource continues the visualisation theme. Vishakha Jha (2017) uses this diagram to inform the discussion of machine learning:

A fourth resource recommendation is Graph Data Structure and Algorithms (2017). This article aggregates a large number of links to graph topics. It includes this explanation:

One of the E-Learning 3.0 course members, Aras Bozkurt, exemplified this theme in this tweet and in doing so underscored the skills available within self-organising networks :

It was a great way to end and start conversations about graphs.

Photo Credits

Title image is from Gonçalves B, Coutinho D, Santos S, Lago-Penas C, Jiménez S, Sampaio J (2017) Exploring Team Passing Networks and Player Movement Dynamics in Youth Association Football. PLoS ONE 12(1): e0171156. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0171156

Other images are frame grabs for the resources cited in this post.