My Project

Back in June 2008, I started writing this WordPress blog (link). I had written on other blogs before and had first dipped my toes with Geocities in the late 1990s.

In 2008, I was emboldened by CCK08 (link) to explore thoughts openly about learning in a digital world. I had not considered that what I wrote would be of interest to any other reader. It was framed by the delight of thinking out loud.

This delight in thinking out loud led me to explore many ways to share openly through emerging cloud resources. Many of these accounts remain and include wikis, talks, slides, documents and data. I was even naive enough to start Facebook pages for some of my units.

Another preoccupation of mine has been the linking of ideas about learning, coaching and performing enriched by my formative experiences of social sciences, teacher education, human movement studies, performance analysis and analytics. This has led me to think deeply about how ideas are formed in social contexts. Many of my posts are about how performance analysts and their collaborators emerged at particular times and particular places and constructed knowledge.

My blog at Clyde Street continues to be my platform for this sharing. I hope to add many more posts to the 1800 produced already. My new guide is the R community that is providing exciting ways to share openly and my old guide, the ever inspiring, Stephen Downes (link).

It has been fascinating how this project has emerged and changed.

Photo Credit

Blue sky thinking (Keith Lyons, CC BY 4.0)

Connecting

A view of Moscow

A couple of days ago, Maha Bali wrote about connecting virtually (link). I was very interested in the ways she explored personal and continuing learning in her post.

Part of her experience was ‘attending’ conferences through the presence of others. I see this as vital in a world where there are so many conferences with a variety of registration, travel and subsistence costs. Partnering someone remotely overcomes the difficulties of cost and distance.

It does nor replace attendance. I am mindful that many people gain immense satisfaction from being present and part of “the hallway and social conversation at the conference”.

However, connecting virtually does offer the possibility of connection in a different kind of way. It is an issue I have been thinking about a great deal.

This Summer, in July, I am facilitating an unmeeting and (un)hack in Moscow with Malte Siegle, Martin Lames and Alexander Danilov prior to the Symposium of the International Association of Computer Science in Sport (link). We have a tentative program to explore data from the 2018 FIFA World Cup Finals and prospecting to Qatar in 2022:

Saturday: 6 July

18:00 PM: Arrival, Registration and Brainstorming

Start of hacking, working and analysing.

Sunday: 7 July

09:00 AM: Morning coffee and recap of Saturday

09:30 AM: Networking and brainstorming

10:00 AM: Hacking, working and analysing

Noon: Lunch

13:00 PM: Hacking, working and analysing

16:00 PM: Break out session

17:00 PM: Elevator pitch presentations of ideas (3 slides, 3 minutes per group).

18:00 PM: Announcement of winners and on to the opening reception of IACCS conference.

This is a framework that we can adapt. Throughout the process, I have been aware that not everyone can attend. There are lots of other opportunities around the world including Seattle and Paris.

I am travelling from Australia to Moscow for the (un)meet and (un)hack. I do take Maha’s point strongly that those who are attending in person can partner with those not there. I wondered if we might connect in real or lapsed time through social media and online platforms. I am going to use Twitter (link), Mastodon (link) and GitHub (link) as part of my aim to connect. I will be using the hashtag #iacss19connect to support this remote sharing.

Photo Credit

Tom Grimbert (@tomgrimbert) on Unsplash

Elo ratings in the #NRL

Each week, I monitor the NRL in Australia and await eagerly Pythago NRL’s (link) update of NRL Elo Ratings (link).

I am fascinated that the author is able to call upon Archimedes and Eratosthenes to help with the ratings (link).

I use RStudio to help visualise the data each week. My week 9 example using ggplot2 and ggrepel is:

Pythago NRL gives me a great opportunity to track which teams are performing well. I am delighted that the system uses Elo ratings. I find the use of median profiles particularly helpful too.