How we talk about coaching and coaches

I have been watching Britain’s Great Art Walks (link). Each week, Gus Casely-Hayford has walked with a companion to explore the work of an artist. Last week he walked with Harriet Walter to discuss Walter Sickert (link).

The Brighton Pierrots (1915)

The Brighton Pierrots (1915

I was particularly interested in Gus and Harriet’s conversation as they explored Walter’s interest in and observations of performance. One of the triggers (and conclusion) was Walter’s 1915 painting, The Brighton Pierrots (link).

The Walks are a great introduction to art, art history and artists. I have been wondering how conversations about coaching, coaching history and coaches might flourish in this format.

The Walks are profoundly well researched and the choice of companion for each walk is inspired. Each week I gain a sense of place and space. The triggers for conversations are art works.

Now that we do have more artefacts about coaching and coaches, I wondered whom we might research and with whom we might talk about coaching, coach history and coaches.

My first choice would be to visit the Ukraine and explore the life and times Valerij Lobanovs’kyj (link). I wondered if Lisa Alexander might walk with me on this visit (link).

The Story of the King’s Cup: 1919-2019

This year marks the centenary of the Peace Regatta (link).

I have been writing about preparations for the centenary since 2014 when I learned about Bruce Coe’s research into the Regatta (link)

Bruce’s research is in his latest book, Pulling Through, published to coincide with the celebrations at Henley in July this year (link).

It is a meticulous account of events in and around 1919 and demonstrates powerfully the role of an historian in pursuing, discovering and sharing primary resources about events that are now beyond living memory.

It is a compelling story. it is one I have just completed reading after seeing the film, Testament of Youth (link).

I do hope Bruce’s book receives a wide readership in this of all years.

Photo Credit

The AIF No. 1 Crew (Rowing Australia website)

The launch of Paralympic Stories

A picture of two Paralympic swimmers from 1964

Paralympics Australia has launched, this week, an online history of the Paralympic movement in Australia, Paralympic Stories (link).

The Australian Paralympic History Project aims to capture, manage, preserve and share the history of the Paralympic movement in Australia in ways that are relevant, accessible and place the Paralympic movement within a broader social context.

The launch of Paralympic Stories is the result of an extensive collaboration between Paralympics Australia and a range of partners, headed by the University of Queensland. Other key partners include the National Library of Australia, the National Film and Sound Archive, the Clearinghouse for Sport and the National Sports Museum.

The project has been coordinated by Tony Naar from its inception in 2010 to this week’s launch of the Stories.

Photo Credit

Daphne Ceeney (link) and Elizabeth Edmondson (link). Photograph from 1964 (Paralymics Australia, (link))