History of the Australian Paralympic Movement: End of Year Report 2017

Australian Paralympian Ray Barrett with the bronze medal he won in the men’s 100m wheelchair 2 event at the 1972 Paralympic Games in Heidelberg, Germany.

The project to record the history of the Paralympic movement in Australia has been underway since 2011.

Tony Naar has shared details of activities in the project in 2017. The project is supported by volunteers. Some of the year’s achievements were:

  • The number of Wikipedia articles created through the project is nearing 1,000.
  • These articles continue to be collectively viewed around 120,000 times every month.
  • The Australian Paralympic Committee (APC) introduced the hashtag #APCOnThisDay to recognise anniversary dates in the history of the Paralympic movement in Australia, using material from the project.
  • Donations and loans of photos, scrapbooks, uniform items and other materials were received from a number of Paralympians and past team officials, including Pauline English, Peter Pascoe, Julie and Eric Russell, Pauline Schreiber, Nick Dean, and others. These are being scanned, sorted and managed for use in the project.
  • Twenty interns (from Macquarie University and University of Western Sydney) have worked on the project at various times during the year. They have: updated the Paralympian contact list; implemented a strategy to recruit people for the archives project; developed a strategy and resources to recruit student volunteers for the Wikipedia project; and created a Facebook group for the project.
  • A new volunteer team of five has started work on organising the APC archive collection.
  • The oral history project with the National Library of Australia reached 54 interviews. The project will continue in 2018.
  • Ray Barrett was inducted into the Indigenous Paralympian honour board at the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence, thanks to detective work by Pat Ollerenshaw.
  • An e-history website has been started and will bring together all the diverse material created through the history project.
  • Project workshops were conducted in Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Sydney, Canberra and Perth.
  • Students at the University of Queensland have worked on Wikipedia articles and the e-history website content.

I have followed these developments in 2017 with great interest. I am delighted that young people are actively engaged in the project and sharing their energy with a core group of volunteers who are nurtured and supported by Tony Naar.

https://twitter.com/AUSParalympics/status/895180323306307585

Photo Credits

Ray Barrett (Australian Paralympic Committee, CC BY-SA 3.0)

Tiffany Thomas Kane (Twitter)

Thinking about unmeetings

Stefanie Butland has been writing about unconferences.

In November, she shared six tips for running a successful unconference.

An ‘unconference’ has no schedule set before the event. Participants discuss project ideas online in advance and projects are selected by participant-voting at the start.

Stefanie’s six tips are:

  • Have a code of conduct.
  • Host online discussion of project ideas before the unconference.
  • Have a pre-unconference video-chat with first-time participants
  • Run an effective ice breaker
  • Have a plan to capture content
  • Care about other people’s success

Stefanie notes that Aidan Budd and his colleagues (2015) have a list of ten rules for organising an unconference.

In a second post in December, Stefanie wrote about the value of welcome in preparing new community members for an unconference.

An unconference of 70 participants had 45 people attending their first unconference. Stephanie wrote an introductory email to these 45:

Stephanie used the free Calendly tool to schedule meetings. She sent some questions in advance of the online conversations (appear.in) and used a Google Form questionnaire to compile responses (individually and collectively).

The online conversations enabled Stephanie “to prime people to connect on day-one of the unconference with others with similar interests or from related work sectors”.  She noticed that: immediately after our conversation, first-time participants would join the online discussion of existing project ideas, or they themselves proposed new ideas. My conversations with two first-time participants led directly to their proposing community-focussed projects – a group discussion and a new blog series of interviews!

She added:

An unexpected benefit was that questions people asked me during the video chats led to actions I could take to improve the unconference. For example, when someone wanted to know what previous participants wished they knew beforehand, I asked for and shared example resources. One wise person asked me what my plan was for having project teams report out at the end of the unconference and this led directly to a streamlined plan (See Six tips for running a successful unconference).

I think Stephanie’s posts are great resources for anyone contemplating an unconference or hackathon. Earlier this year, I was involved in a hackathon in Ireland (#abbotsthon17). One of the issues that did arise then was how to connect a community that was emerging.

Stephanie’s introductory, welcome email resonates strongly with my interest in first-in-family initiatives in higher education. It resonates too with Nancy White’s stewardship practices.

From each of these inspirations, I am very clear about the importance of inducting people into a community and supporting them once they have made the decision to engage (or even participate peripherally).

Photo Credits

Stefanie Butland (Twitter)

P1580274 (David Haberthür, CC BY-NC 2.0)

ChangeMakers (#RecogniseHer)

Lady Eleanor Holles Scool lacrosse team 1968

The Anita White Foundation and the University of Chichester Institute of Sport are hosting a website to make “Celia Brackenridge’s life and work as a scholar and activist accessible and available to individuals, groups and organisations who are interested in women, sport, and social change”.

The website is titled Women and Sport: The ChangeMakers. The website has pages on:

An About page has this background information:

The website is a project of the Anita White Foundation (AWF) as part of the University of Chichester, drawing on materials donated by Celia Brackenridge to the AWF, and stored in the Anita White Foundation International Women and Sport Archive at the University of Chichester. Celia has been a supporter of the AWF since its launch in 2011, and the AWF wanted to use this interactive digital resource to make Celia’s life and work accessible to scholars and activists interested in women, sport and social change, and to inspire future women leaders of sport.

There is an official launch of the website on Friday 14 July at Guildford. In my excitement I tweeted about the website but realise I need to wait for the day! There is a # linked to the event, #RecogniseHer.

I do think this is a wonderful initiative and a very powerful resource. One person’s journey to and from the picture at the top of this post has inspired and will continue to inspire many others.

Photo Credits

Lady Eleanor Holles School lacrosse team 1968 (Sporting Honours)

Celia Brackenridge (Lacrosse Talk)