Grazing on the periphery

It has been a great week for grazing … much of it enabled by Mara Averick’s open sharing.

It started with news of Alison Hill’s speakerdeck presentation.

Alison discusses courage, enchantment, permission, persistence and trust as elements of creative learning. She concludes with this slide:

What fascinated me about Alison’s presentation was her synthesis of profound ideas about sharing and learning with each other in an aesthetic that grabbed and held my attention for 94 slides.

She is part of a remarkable R community that shares openly.

Three other members of this community enabled even more grazing this week. Each offered me possibilities to extend my knowledge of visualisation using R.

Matt Dancho has shared the Anomalize package that enables a “tidy” workflow for detecting anomalies in time series data. There is a vignette for the package to share the process of identifying these events. I think this will be very helpful in my performance research as I investigate seasonal and trend behaviours.

Ulrike Groemping shared the prepplot package in which “a figure region is prepared, creating a plot region with suitable background color, grid lines or shadings, and providing axes and labeling if not suppressed. Subsequently, information carrying graphics elements can be added”.  There is a detailed vignette to support the package.

Guangchuang Yu shared the ggplotify package that converts “plot function call (using expression or formula) to ‘grob’ or ‘ggplot’ object that compatible to the ‘grid’ and ‘ggplot2’ ecosystem”.  Guangchang shares a detailed vignette that illustrates the potential of the package.

Mara, Alison, Matt, Ulrike and Guangchuand epitomise for me the delights in open sharing. A post in The Scholarly Kitchen, written by Alice Meadows, added to my grazing on the margins of openly sharing.

In the post Alice shares a wide range of resources. She makes a particular mention of the Metadata 2020 project that is “a collaboration that advocates richer, connected, and reusable, open metadata for all research outputs, which will advance scholarly pursuits for the benefit of society.”

The opportunities for such collaboration are increasing as we find new ways to share synchronously and asynchronously. These become easier as we make a bold decision to think out loud and share our thoughts with others.

Alison’s presentation includes this slide as a stimulus for that sharing:

This sharing permits grazing for me in the sense of the word used in Leonard Cohen’s Preface to the Chinese translation of his collection of Beautiful Losers poems includes this passage:

When I was young, my friends and I read and admired the old Chinese poets. Our ideas of love and friendship, of wine and distance, of poetry itself, were much affected by those ancient songs. … So you can understand, Dear Reader, how privileged I feel to be able to graze, even for a moment, and with such meager credentials, on the outskirts of your tradition.

Photo Credits

Slide grabs from Alison Hill’s speakerdeck.

Pictures from Twitter and Beuth Hochschule.

Collaboration image from Alice Meadow’s post.

History of the Australian Paralympic Movement: End of Year Report 2017

Australian Paralympian Ray Barrett with the bronze medal he won in the men’s 100m wheelchair 2 event at the 1972 Paralympic Games in Heidelberg, Germany.

The project to record the history of the Paralympic movement in Australia has been underway since 2011.

Tony Naar has shared details of activities in the project in 2017. The project is supported by volunteers. Some of the year’s achievements were:

  • The number of Wikipedia articles created through the project is nearing 1,000.
  • These articles continue to be collectively viewed around 120,000 times every month.
  • The Australian Paralympic Committee (APC) introduced the hashtag #APCOnThisDay to recognise anniversary dates in the history of the Paralympic movement in Australia, using material from the project.
  • Donations and loans of photos, scrapbooks, uniform items and other materials were received from a number of Paralympians and past team officials, including Pauline English, Peter Pascoe, Julie and Eric Russell, Pauline Schreiber, Nick Dean, and others. These are being scanned, sorted and managed for use in the project.
  • Twenty interns (from Macquarie University and University of Western Sydney) have worked on the project at various times during the year. They have: updated the Paralympian contact list; implemented a strategy to recruit people for the archives project; developed a strategy and resources to recruit student volunteers for the Wikipedia project; and created a Facebook group for the project.
  • A new volunteer team of five has started work on organising the APC archive collection.
  • The oral history project with the National Library of Australia reached 54 interviews. The project will continue in 2018.
  • Ray Barrett was inducted into the Indigenous Paralympian honour board at the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence, thanks to detective work by Pat Ollerenshaw.
  • An e-history website has been started and will bring together all the diverse material created through the history project.
  • Project workshops were conducted in Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Sydney, Canberra and Perth.
  • Students at the University of Queensland have worked on Wikipedia articles and the e-history website content.

I have followed these developments in 2017 with great interest. I am delighted that young people are actively engaged in the project and sharing their energy with a core group of volunteers who are nurtured and supported by Tony Naar.

Photo Credits

Ray Barrett (Australian Paralympic Committee, CC BY-SA 3.0)

Tiffany Thomas Kane (Twitter)

Thinking about unmeetings

Stefanie Butland has been writing about unconferences.

In November, she shared six tips for running a successful unconference.

An ‘unconference’ has no schedule set before the event. Participants discuss project ideas online in advance and projects are selected by participant-voting at the start.

Stefanie’s six tips are:

  • Have a code of conduct.
  • Host online discussion of project ideas before the unconference.
  • Have a pre-unconference video-chat with first-time participants
  • Run an effective ice breaker
  • Have a plan to capture content
  • Care about other people’s success

Stefanie notes that Aidan Budd and his colleagues (2015) have a list of ten rules for organising an unconference.

In a second post in December, Stefanie wrote about the value of welcome in preparing new community members for an unconference.

An unconference of 70 participants had 45 people attending their first unconference. Stephanie wrote an introductory email to these 45:

Stephanie used the free Calendly tool to schedule meetings. She sent some questions in advance of the online conversations (appear.in) and used a Google Form questionnaire to compile responses (individually and collectively).

The online conversations enabled Stephanie “to prime people to connect on day-one of the unconference with others with similar interests or from related work sectors”.  She noticed that: immediately after our conversation, first-time participants would join the online discussion of existing project ideas, or they themselves proposed new ideas. My conversations with two first-time participants led directly to their proposing community-focussed projects – a group discussion and a new blog series of interviews!

She added:

An unexpected benefit was that questions people asked me during the video chats led to actions I could take to improve the unconference. For example, when someone wanted to know what previous participants wished they knew beforehand, I asked for and shared example resources. One wise person asked me what my plan was for having project teams report out at the end of the unconference and this led directly to a streamlined plan (See Six tips for running a successful unconference).

I think Stephanie’s posts are great resources for anyone contemplating an unconference or hackathon. Earlier this year, I was involved in a hackathon in Ireland (#abbotsthon17). One of the issues that did arise then was how to connect a community that was emerging.

Stephanie’s introductory, welcome email resonates strongly with my interest in first-in-family initiatives in higher education. It resonates too with Nancy White’s stewardship practices.

From each of these inspirations, I am very clear about the importance of inducting people into a community and supporting them once they have made the decision to engage (or even participate peripherally).

Photo Credits

Stefanie Butland (Twitter)

P1580274 (David Haberthür, CC BY-NC 2.0)