Migratning IACSS09

In December 2008 I came across the social media service provided by Ning. I am always keen to explore the functionality of social media tools and signed up for a Premium Service account with Ning. This account provided an advert-clear skin for the site.

I thought I would use the IACSS09 conference as the focus of the Ning site. I have written about the site in a post titled Sport n.0: Connecting Social Networks.

I liked Ning’s mix of tools and thought they exemplified Clark Quinn’s (2009) observation that social media provide:

A rich ecosystem of tools supporting communities to share thinking, solve problems, and create innovative new solutions is a fountain of new value to the organization.

This year Ning is changing account structures and a number of users of the service have chosen to migrate their content to other sites. I wondered if the word to describe this move was migratning.

Given the IACSS09 site was a specific attempt to use social media for an event I have decided to close the Ning site. Ning provided the export tools for this activity:

I have reposited the IOCSS09 Ning archive at this Box.Net link. Some Ning groups have moved their site content to Grou.ps. Ozgur Kuru provides some additional information about this process.

Some time ago I thought I might distribute the information about IACSS09 in the cloud. In addition to the Box.Net link

This process has helped me understand the potential of social media tools and has underscored the importance of curating ephemeral content. Some material from the conference is unavailable including the official web site and the Twitter #iacss09 tag.

Photo Credit

Tangled

Additional Resources for #IACSS09

I have been working on the Proceedings for the International Association of Computer Science in Sport’s Seventh Symposium held in Canberra in September 2009. There are a number of resources I want to add to the Symposium record and this post is a repository for some of these.

For those who would like a record of the Abstracts. These can be found in a Box.Net file share. This folder on Box.Net contains twenty-three PowerPoint presentations not included in the Symposium SlideShare collection.

I have included these abstracts and PowerPoint slides with the permission of the authors as a contribution to the development of open access resources for students of computer science in sport.

The proceedings with an ISBN will appear later this month as an electronic document shared openly with a global community of interested colleagues.

Photo Credits

What can be done with Flickr? Cogdogblog

Reading the TV Novels Summary Pedrosimoes7

Metallica at Rock Werchter 2009 Crsan

#IACSS09

This blog post is my keynote address to IACSS09.

200px-MarshallMcLuhan Source

If a new technology extends one or more of our senses outside us into the social world, then new ratios among all of our senses will occur in that particular culture.

When the sense ratios alter in any culture then what had appeared lucid before may suddenly become opaque, and what had been vague or opaque will become translucent.

Instead of tending towards a vast Alexandrian library the world has become a computer, an electronic brain … (Marshall McLuhan)

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This process has accelerated since these insights were first published in McLuhan’s work. The Twitter example from Infoharmoni exemplifies this I believe. (“This is a dynamic network, showing what companies the 200 most prolific tweets were talking about. Both people and companies are nodes, and the edges change over the course of the day. Everytime a person tweets about a company, an edge is added connecting that person to the company. After 30 minutes, the edge decays. The companies are labeled, and the individuals are anonymized here”.)

I did not mention McLuhan’s global village ideas I made in a post recently but I have taken the fate of equus grevyi very seriously!

cover_zebras

Males are highly territorial, claiming prime watering and grazing areas with piles of dung called middens. They generally live alone in their territories, except when females move through during mating season. Non-territorial males travel together in groups of two to six animals. This social system differs from that of other zebras, which typically form female harems that live in one male’s territory all year. During dry months, many Grevy’s zebras migrate to greener mountain pastures, but males on prime territories often remain there year-round.

Interestingly “each zebra has its own unique set of stripes, which are as distinctive as fingerprints”.

I would like to use the ecology of Grevy’s Zebra to discuss social networks stimulated by Dan Rubinstein’s 2007 paper and my experience of connectivism through my participation in CCK08 (and CCK09).

It is a discussion about digital ethnography too inspired by some of Michael Wesch‘s insights.

To be continued …