Developing resources for #abbotsthon17

The banner for the Knowledge Exchange Conference to be held in Dubli, October 2017

I was in Dublin last week and had the opportunity to meet Alan Swanton, Performance Analyst Lead, and Daragh Sheridan, Head of Capability and Expertise, at Sport Ireland Institute.

Alan has made a brave decision to invite me to participate in the HPX 2017 Knowledge Exchange Conference in Dublin in October. I am delighted that Daragh supported Alan’s decision.

My participation has two parts. The first is a one day hackathon (#abbotsthon17) with performance analysts on 5 October the day before the start of the conference. The second is a presentation on the first morning of the conference. It is titled Performance Analysis and Data Analytics – Are we there yet?  (There is a draft of the presentation on Google Slides.)

This blog post is a place holder for resources I am developing for the workshop and conference. It is connected also to a MailChimp autoresponder idea for the workshop.

By coincidence, shortly after my meeting with Alan and Daragh I saw Oisin Kelly’s sculpture, the Chariot of Life. The publicart.ie website notes:

Kelly’s large copper-bronze sculpture depicts the figure of a charioteer said to represents reason controlling the emotions.

This seems a great starting point for a conversation about performance analysis.

A photograph of Oisin Kelly's sculpture 'The Chariot of Life', Dublin.

Photo Credit

Chariot of Life (Keith Lyons, CC BY 4.0)

The Spirit of Sport

Tokyo 1964: Great Britain's Ann Packer (left) silver medallist acknowledges defeat at the hands of Australia's Betty Cuthbert (centre), winner of the 400m. Bronze medallist Judith Amooreis on the right.

Introduction

Two events this week in the world of athletics have sent me off thinking about the essence of sport. By coincidence, a friend, Daniel O’Leary has been thinking about spirituality in sport too.

Daniel and I share a fascination with one of the events of the week, Usain Bolt’s 100m final at the World Athletics Championships. I watched it on TV live when I was in England. Daniel was there trackside.

The second event of the week for me was news of Betty Cuthbert‘s death.

Daniel has given me permission to share his thoughts on his experience of being present at the 100m final in London. He and I have been discussing sport for the last thirty-five years since we were first introduced by my wife Sue at St Mary’s College in Strawberry Hill.

This is what he wrote.

Gold of the Spirit

A picture of Daniel O'LearySeated near the finish we held our breath. The intense hush was shattered by a gun. Bolt blasted from the blocks. The noise was deafening from a packed stadium. It was pure spectacle. Inside ten seconds it was over. Our hero, after all, was mortal.

But in the drama of the day, was he more than that? At the bitter point of his defeat, did he not prove himself to be a golden hero of the soul? While thousands vented their gall on the new and quickly humiliated champion Justin Gatlin, we watched the warm exchange of words and hugs between victor and vanquished. There was a grace in the way Usain Bolt acknowledged his shared humanity with his conqueror, showed his respect and appreciation for another great athlete. ‘’He has done his time,’ he said later,’ he is a good person, he has worked hard, he is my friend and an excellent person’. And then there was an iconic moment, carrying traces of the Prodigal Son, when Gatlin bent his knee before Usain Bolt.

Usain Bolt and Justin Gatlin embrace

At a pinnacle of a celebration of worldwide sporting achievement it was a sad and shameful day for the furious and booing fanatics described by champion Welsh hurdler Dai Greene as ‘savage’. ‘The media and the masses have turned Justin Gatlin into a villain,’ tweeted James Ellington, former British international 100m sprint champion. It is one thing to be deeply disappointed that your hero lost; it is quite another to spit out bile on the one who ended his dream. If anyone lost in disgrace it was the ‘fans’. They clouded a happy summer’s evening that was full of beauty, blessing and delight for families into an ugly mist of personal pique. The weather changed then and many sensitive souls felt a chill. In a world riven by dark forces another golden opportunity for a brief but unique experience of universal harmony was shattered.

There is a deep and invisible power at the heart of the sporting life. Australian Herb Elliott, who took the 1500 metres gold medal in Rome (1960), wrote of the ‘spirituality’ of athletic competition. So did North American Ed Moses, another world champion (400m), when he spoke of the influence and force of sport to unite the world. And so did Nelson Mandela when he said that sport ‘can create hope and peace where there was previously only despair’. Golf hero Paul McGinley who witnessed some really demeaning behaviour at a Ryder Cup competition wrote, ‘intense competitiveness that also touches the soul is the essence of great sport.’ There is more to sport than the medals.

There is an invincible, un-extinguishable light of the spirit that lasts longer than the shining of a gold medal. We were not blessed with such an enlightenment on Saturday night, 5 August. But we do have sublime examples of it.

One such moment happened in the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. World Champion Jesse Owens was watching his dream slipping away. He had fouled his first two attempts at the long jump. His blond German competitor Ludwig ‘Lutz’ Long explained to him how he could avoid a final foul by using a simple strategy. Owens took his advice and went on to win the gold medal with a final leap of 8.06 metres. And Hitler stormed out of the stadium. Moved by the spontaneous graciousness of his closest rival, Jess Owens later said, ‘It took a lot of courage for him to befriend me in front of Hitler. You can melt down all the medals and cups I have won and they would not provide the gold- plating for the twenty-four carat friendship that I felt for Lutz Long at that moment’.

Betty

Daniel and I have not discussed Betty. Daniel was involved in athletics when Betty was running in Melbourne and Tokyo.

I was just four at the time of the Melbourne Olympics when Betty ran into history

This was Betty in 2012

Betty’s personal best times were:

  • 100 metres 11.4s
  • 200 metres 23.2s
  • 400 metres 52.01s

Her personal best for the 200 metres would have positioned her just 0.8s behind the winners of both semi-finals in London 61 years later. Her 100 metres time would have put her 0.55s behind the winner in London. Her 400 metre time would have put her in contention for a 7th place in the London final and 2.12s off the winner Phyllis Francis.

Spirit as the New Edge

Daniel and I came to Usain Bolt from different epistemological traditions. I think we share a profound humanistic commitment to the spirit of sport. Betty epitomises everything I hold dear about sport. I love the idea that an 18 year-old can arrive in Melbourne and win three gold medals.

Betty Cuthbert flying at the Melbourne 1956 Games is a feature of Chapter 15 of the book From Athens With Pride, written by Harry Gordon and launched in Sydney on 9 May 2014.

However, the picture at the top of this post is my enduring memory of Betty. I saw her race in Tokyo in 1964 on a black and white television in my home in North Wales. The commentary that day focused on Ann Packer who won the silver medal for Great Britain. But I do remember the commentator, David Coleman, making specific mention of the spirit that connected all three athletes at the end of the race.

I am not making an argument for a golden age but do want to champion a different kind of sport, at all levels.

I hope that we can stop talking about podiums and talk more about a common humanity that is expressed through athletic effort. This effort is ethically driven and focused on process rather than outcome.

Photo Credits

1964 Final (AOC Media Centre)

Daniel O’Leary (Begin with the Heart)

Justin Gatlin and Usain Bolt (Daily Star)

1956 (AOC Media Centre)

What is it we do in Performance Analysis?

One of Jacquie Tran‘s delightful sketchnotes appeared in my Twitter feed a couple of days ago …

It coincided with a message I received from Jamie Coles and the subsequent guest posts that appeared on Clyde Street today.

Doug‘s definition of performance analysis includes ‘insight’, ‘information’ and ‘decisions’. Jacquie’s note of his definition sent me off thinking about some other words too … ‘augmentation’, ‘support’ and ‘actionable’.

In my thinking, I returned to two seminal papers from the same year, 1991, that helped me reflect on what the craft of performance analysis might involve at the time I was establishing the Centre for Notational Analysis in Cardiff:

Ian Franks and Gary Miller, Training coaches to observe and remember. Their abstract:

This study tested a video training method that was intended to improve the observational skills of soccer coaches. Three groups of soccer coaches were tested prior to and following a training period. The experimental group was exposed to a video training programme that was designed to highlight certain key elements of soccer team performance. Although both control groups were exposed to the same video excerpts as the experimental group, they were given different orienting activities. The subjects in control group 2 were asked to discuss these excerpts with a colleague and then write a report on what they had seen, while control group 1 members repeated prior test conditions that required them to remember certain events that preceded the scoring of goals. The results indicate that, although all coaches were incapable of remembering more than 40% of pertinent information, the subjects in the experimental group improved their ability to recall all events that surrounded the ‘taking of shots’.

Richard Schmidt‘s, Frequent augmented feedback can degrade learning: Evidence and interpretations. His abstract includes these observations:

Several lines of evidence from various research paradigms show that, as compared to feedback provided frequently (after every trial) less frequent feedback provides benefits in learning as measured on tests of long-term retention.  … several interpretations are provided in terms of the underlying processes that are degraded by frequent feedback.

I do think both are very important primary sources for performance analysts. They form part of the epistemological foundations that informed Doug’s presentation.

His definition also includes ‘effective’ and ‘efficient’ dimensions. Both emphasise for me the social skills of the performance analyst in harmony with the everyday coaching environment and the rhythms of a season.

Jacquie’s sketchnote raised again for me the inevitable merging of performance analysis and analytics. I revisited Chris Anderson’s (2014) definition of sports analytics as:

The discovery, communication, and implementation of actionable insights derived from structured information in order to improve the quality of decisions and performance in an organization.

And Bill Gerard’s (2016) proposal for “a narrow definition of sports analytics” as the analysis of tactical data to support tactics-related sporting decisions. He suggests “this narrow definition captures the uniqueness and the innovatory nature of sports analytics as the analysis of tactical performance data.”

I am immensely grateful to Jacquie for this prompt. I was not able to attend at which Doug and others presented and found her visualisation of the day very welcome.