Making sense of data practices

Laura Ellis has been writing this week about solving business problems with data (link). The alert to her post came shortly after another link had taken me back to a presentation by Dan Weaving in 2017 on load monitoring in sport (link). A separate alert had drawn my attention to two Cassie Kozyrkov articles, one on hypotheses (link) and the second on what great data analysts do (link).

I have all these as tabs in my browser at the moment. They joined the tab holding David Snowden and Mary Boone’s (2007) discussion of a leader’s framework for decision-making (link).

These five connections make for fascinating reading. A good starting point, I think, is David and Mary’s visualisation that forms the reference point for the application of the Cynefin framework:

They observe “the Cynefin framework helps leaders determine the prevailing operative context so that they can make appropriate choices”.

The 2007 visualisation was modified in 2014 when ‘simple‘ became ‘obvious‘ (link). Disorder is in the centre of the diagram wherein there is no clarity about which of the other domains apply:

In a book chapter published in the year 2000 (link), David notes “the Cynefin model focuses on the location of knowledge in an organization using cultural and sense making …”. Laura, Dan and Cassie provide excellent examples of this sense-making in their own cultural contexts.

Many of my colleagues in sport will appreciate this slide from Dan’s presentation that exhorts us “to adopt a systematic process to reduce data by understanding the similarity and uniqueness of the multiple measures we collect”:

… whilst being very clear about the time constraints to share the outcomes of this process with coaches.

Photo Credit

Arboretum – Bonsai (Meg Rutherford, CC BY 2.0)

#coachlearning: when Thomas meets Adam and friends

I tend to listen to classical music whenever I am travelling. I feel really comfortable with that kind of music.

Over the years I have thought about the connections that might be made in coach learning with composers, conductors and musicians.

There are lots of posts on Clyde Street about my imagined connections between classical music and coaching. Last year, for example, motets struck me as a way to discuss coaching. I included this quote about the Thomas Tallis Spem in Alium (written for 40 voices):

The work is a study in contrasts: the individual voices sing and are silent in turns, sometimes alone, sometimes in choirs, sometimes calling and answering, sometimes all together, so that, far from being a monotonous mess, the work is continually presenting new ideas.

I particularly like the idea of performance “presenting new ideas”. In this example, the motet is sung by 700 rather than 40 voices, and raised for me the idea about the scalability of performance:

Occasionally, I break away from classical musical and end up meeting other musicians like the Pierce Brothers and Tash Sultana. They helped me think about performances of understanding.

This week, I discovered, Adam Levine and Maroon 5.

I have had the good fortune to work with many female athletes and coaches of female athletes. When I saw Maroon 5’s Girls Like You video, I immediately thought about how a coach might support the diversity of talents and life experiences in a team.

The video is 4 minutes 30 seconds long and has a remarkable cast. I have replayed the video many times now and it is strikes me forcefully what we might learn from it to support coaches as they explore their practice and their performances.

If you would like to learn more about the people who appeared in the video, you might find this Billboard article of interest (link).

I am delighted Thomas has met Adam via a short detour with the Pierce Brothers and Tash. I think we have lots to learn within sport from outside experiences of performance and how we might enable a commonwealth of talent.

Sharing insights and decision-making experiences

Braidwood is my St Mary Mead and Lake Wobegon.

It is a place where I can ponder events way beyond this small rural New South Wales town and connect with them through events in the town.

This weekend, the Braidwood Festival has been helping me reflect on thoughts about insights and decision-making shared by Jacquie Tran.

Jacquie’s presentation, From insights to decisions: Knowledge sharing in sports analytics, has stimulated lots of interest and conversations. One of the observations Jacquie has made is:

Enter Braidwood into this conversation.

This weekend, the Festival of Braidwood has included an airing of quilts, an Art on the Farms exhibition, and open gardens. All of these have a synchronicity with Jacquie’s discussion. I have two examples from the weekend to illustrate the points Jacquie is making.

The first is from on of the exhibits, an upholstered chair by Heidi Horwood.

In the exhibition catalogue, Heidi writes:

The chair was found in a shed on a farm in Braidwood in a state of considerable disrepair. Many of the fabrics that make the patchwork in this project are very old and sourced in Braidwood. … I love the sense of history in old chairs and imagine the comfort they have brought.

The second is from a the Linden Garden at Jembaicumbene. The gardeners there have transformed the garden in five years. They have planted trees, herbaceous borders and found ways to manage limited resources in a windswept location.

The garden draws inspiration from landscape designer Nicole de Vesian, who at 70 translated her experience as a designer for Hermes to create her garden, La Louve in Provence.

I hope both examples add to the conversation Jacquie has started about insights. In both of them there is a bisociation occuring. Arthur Koestler said of bisociation “The discoveries of yesterday are the truisms of tomorrow, because we can add to our knowledge but cannot subtract from it.”

Having a sense of who we were and who we are gives us opportunities to consider how we will be. I see this a profoundly shared experience.

I wonder what you think.

Photo Credits

Braidwood (Jack Featherstone)

Jack Bourke shearing (Katie Lyons, Art on Farms)

Chair (Heidi Horwood)

Linden Garden (Braidwood Open Gardens)

Bedervale (Keith Lyons, CC BY 4.0)