Scoring first and losing in six European league competitions 2017-2018: Update

There have been 21 games this season in six European leagues (EPL, Ligue 1, Eredivisie, Bundesliga, Serie A, Primera) in which the team that scored first has lost (as of 18 September).

The games are:

  • Serie A (5)

Benevento Calcio v Sampdoria (Round 1)

Roma v Inter (Round 2)

Atalanta v Napoli (Round 2)

Genoa v Juventus (Round 2)

Sassuolo Calcio v Atalanta (Round 3)

  • Ligue 1 (4)

Toulouse v Monaco (Round 1)

Metz v Guingamp (Round 1)

Toulouse v PSG (Round 3)

Rennes v Toulouse (Round 4).

  • Eredivisie (4)

Alkmaar v Eindhoven (Round 1)

Ajax v Heracles Almelo (Round 1)

Roda JC Kerkrade v PEC Zwolle (Round 1)

SBV Excelsior v sc Heerenveen (Round 5)

  • Primera (3)

Celta Vigo v Real Sociadad (Round 1) 

Celta Vigo v Real Betis (Round 2)

Getafe CF v Barcelona (Round 4)

  • Bundesliga (3)

Freiburg v Leipzig (Round 2)

Bayer Leverkusen v Mainz (Round 3)

Werder Bremen v FC Schalke 04 (Round 4)

  • EPL (2)

Bournemouth v Manchester City (Round 3)

Brighton v Bournemouth (Round 5)

Photo Credit

FC Schalke 04 (Twitter)

Critical friendship thoughts for #RUOK day: from a sport perspective

Thursday, 14 September, is R U OK? Day in Australia.

I have been thinking about the role critical friendship can play in conversations about personal well-being in sport.

One of the papers that has influenced my thing about critical friendship was written by John MacBeath and Stewart Jardine twenty years ago. It is titled ‘I didn’t know he was ill – the role and value of the critical friend‘.

They start their consideration of critical friendship with this paragraph:

The critical friend is a powerful idea,perhaps because it contains an inherent tension. Friends bring a high degree of unconditional positive regard. They are forgiving and tolerant of your failings. They sometimes even love you for your faults. Critics are at first sight, at least, conditional, negative and intolerant of failure. Perhaps the critical friend comes closest to what might be regarded as the ‘true friendship’ – a successful marrying of unconditional support and unconditional critique. (1998:41)

They explore how this ‘true friendship’ can flourish with and through unconditional listening … and a willingness to challenge.

In five years as a critical friend with a group of thirty coaches, I have tried to learn how to balance listening with opportunities to challenge.

The challenge moments come at times when coaches’ self-esteem is high and the world is a secure place to be. It is not always connected with winning but that adds to buoyancy and openness.

In the five years of the friendships there have been times when listening was the natural thing to do when coaches enter dark places.

All the coaches in the group have a high public profile. The performances of their teams is subject to intense public scrutiny and at the worst of times their personal integrity is under direct and sustained attack. This engulfs their family too.

In good times, coaches and their families have more ‘friends’ than they could imagine. In bad times, the number of friends diminish. It affects the whole family and in some cases leads to their children being bullied at school.

My concern is that as a culture we have normalised the extreme language used to vilify coaches. Sitting with coaches who have entered dark woods affirms the costs of this language.

Back in 2011, Ben Pobjie wrote:

Because I know now the desperate flailing, the horrific suffocation that comes when those black waves come crashing over and you find yourself just about incapable of keeping your head up in the face of the merciless tides. But we’re all capable. We may have to lean on others from time to time, but we don’t have to fall. Tomorrow I may feel them crashing again, and become convinced that none of this is true, but now I have to affirm that it IS. (My emphasis.)

There have been five explicit occasions in my time with coaches that they have been subject to merciless tides. There have been many more times when coaches have not communicated about these tides.

I do infuse my critical friendship with R U OK? thinking. I hope my coach friends feel they can lean on me but despite my offers they sometimes choose not to lean.

R U OK? Day is my opportunity to revisit this paradox of being available, of having ‘unconditional positive regard’, of loving them to bits … and still coming up short as a critical friend.

Scoring first and losing in six European football leagues 2017-2018

A picture of sassuolo calcio's first goal against Atalanta in Serie A

At the end of league games on 11 September, 212 games had been played in six European football leagues: EPL (40), Ligue 1 (50), Bundesliga (27), Eredivisie (36), Primera (30); and Serie A (29).

In 17 of these games, the team that scored first lost. Their occurrences are:

  • Serie A (5)

Benevento Calcio v Sampdoria (Round 1)

Roma v Inter (Round 2)

Atalanta v Napoli (Round 2)

Genoa v Juventus (Round 2)

Sassuolo Calcio v Atalanta (Round 3)

  • Ligue 1 (4)

Toulouse v Monaco (Round 1)

Metz v Guingamp (Round 1)

Toulouse v PSG (Round 3)

Rennes v Toulouse (Round 4).

  • Eredivisie (3)

Alkmaar v Eindhoven (Round 1)

Ajax v Heracles Almelo (Round 1)

Roda JC Kerkrade v PEC Zwolle (Round 1)

  • Primera (2)

Celta Vigo v Real Sociadad (Round 1) 

Celta Vigo v Real Betis (Round 2)

  • Bundesliga (2)

Freiburg v Leipzig (Round 2)

Bayer Leverkusen v Mainz (Round 3)

  • EPL (1)

Bournemouth v Manchester City (Round 3)

My aim is to update this post throughout the season. I am fascinated by this group of games as the exceptions to the impact of scoring first and not losing. As of 11 September the median % of teams scoring first and not losing in six European leagues was 86%.

Photo Credit

Sassuolo Calcio v Atalanta (Frame grab)